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Wednesday, November 6
 

9:00am

KEYNOTE: Andrew Ng
Andrew Ng is co-founder of Coursera, and developed the initial platform for Stanford’s online machine learning and databases classes that started the popularization of MOOCs. He wants to give everyone access to the best professors in the best universities in the world, for free. In his spare time, he runs the Stanford AI Lab, builds large scale brain simulations, and practices sucking at ping pong.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 9:40am
Kokopelli

9:45am

KEYNOTE: George Siemens
George Siemens is a Professor at the Center for Distance Education and a researcher and strategist with the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute (TEKRI) at Athabasca University in Alberta, Canada. He is the author of the Connectivism theory of learning and co-creator of the first MOOC in 2008.

Speakers
GS

George Siemens

University of Texas Arlington, Link Lab


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:45am - 10:30am
Kokopelli

10:45am

Open content facilitated STEM Challenges
STEM Challenges is framework that can be used to describe, disseminate, and instantiate many existing engaging, effective learning activities. STEM Challenges include a (1) rich media description of a real-world discovery, event, or goal (e.g. colonizing mars), (2) a description of a smaller challenge that learners could actually work on, (3) interactive models and other resources for problem solving, (4) a mechanism for sharing and discussing solutions, and (5) extensions to more challenges. A STEM Challenge platform should support cataloging existing good challenges by reference and providing the ability for individuals and groups to "instantiate" the challenges for their contexts, adapt existing challenges, and creating new ones. This session will give examples of how open content and tools such as Open Tapestry can play a key role in enabling the implementation and dissemination of the STEM Challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Ball

Justin Ball

CTO, Atomic Jolt
I measure my chocolate consumption in pounds.
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.


Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Arrowhead

10:45am

Learner-Driven Liberation: Open Badges & New Knowledge Sharing
In an age of anywhere, anytime learning, learners and educators who design Open Badges are re-inventing recognition. Credentials no longer need to be limited to transcripts or printed certificates; now they can be virtual, shareable and peer-issued. Advocates of open educational resources can use Mozilla's open technical standard to make symbols of skills and interests portable and interoperable. Our conversational panel will feature badge issuing educational organizations and employers interested in using badges to identify talent. Together, we'll examine real world examples of badges in the wild. Our panel will also explore: a) the ways in which badges can be used to demonstrate interests and competencies; and b) the methods by which individuals are using badges to access new educational and professional opportunities. The conversation will focus on current and future interpretations of skill and interest recognition for organizations, educators, and learners.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
White Pine

10:45am

The Saylor Foundation K-12 Initiative - Full Curriculum OER
Find out about the Saylor Foundation's current approach to building Common Core-aligned curricula out of existing OER. Participants will learn and engage on the following topics: How can OER help with Common Core alignment, going digital and flipping the classroom? How are students and educators using our courses? What issues do educators have in finding and using OER? How are we trying to make adoption of OER easier and more feasible? What kind of interest has there been from students, teachers, school districts and states?

Speakers
avatar for Angelyn Pinter

Angelyn Pinter

K-12 Content Development Manager, The Saylor Foundation


Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Kokopelli

10:45am

Perceptions of Public Libraries in the U.S. on Public Domain and Creative Commons
A quantitative survey was administered to public library staff across the United States via an email inquiry and an anonymous online Web survey form as can be seen at http://www.ourdeskdrawer.com/librarysurvey/index.php?sid=49372&lang=en which asked their thoughts on public domain, creative commons, and CCO. Of 715 inquiries sent, 113 responses were received. Overall, our results were surprising in that while all librarians who completed the full survey (n=54) knew at least to some level the definition of public domain, only 36% were able to define creative commons and only 19% were able to define CC0. This means that a great majority of librarians were not even aware of these services.

After initial questions on the definitions of public domain, creative commons, and CCO librarians were asked to describe how they see items in the public domain affecting a) social and cultural perceptions of copyright and/or intellectual property; b) legal perceptions or practices of copyright and/or intellectual property, c) practices of citation and attribution, d) public libraries generally, and e) generally negative or positive perceptions. Results in every category were considerably mixed. Next, Everett Rogers? four main elements in the diffusion of innovations were used as the theoretical framework. The four main elements are the innovation itself, communication channels, time, and the social system. Again, the results were mixed.

The book Contemporary Technology, notes technology transfer is ?the process by which technology developed for one purpose is employed either in a different application or by a new user.? (Markert & Backer, 2003). It also describes two important aspects of technology transfer study to include the nature of the transfer item itself and the recipient?s capacity to adopt the technology once it has been transferred. A key aspect of a recipient?s capacity to adopt a technology involves awareness and knowledge. This preliminary research points to only limited knowledge of public domain, the role of creative commons, and the function of CCO even among public library staff whose primary function is to share resources with the local public they serve. This plays a role both directly and indirectly in synergies between open education, creative commons and other alternatives to full copyright restrictions, and more traditional public means to data and information access available via resources such as public libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Anne Arendt

Dr. Anne Arendt

Asst. Professor /Asst. Chair - Technology Management, Utah Valley University
Dr. Anne Arendt is an Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair in Technology Management at Utah Valley University. She has a Doctorate of Education in Higher Education from Utah State University, a Master of Business Administration from Carlson School of Management at University of Minnesota, and a Master of Education from Walden University. She is also American Society of Quality Six Sigma Black Belt certified. She has been at UVU for over twelve... Read More →
avatar for Dustin Fife

Dustin Fife

Library Director, San Juan County
I am a library director of a rural library system in southeastern Utah and a Library and Information Science graduate student at Emporia State University. | | I am also involved in an open library resource sharing project through ILEAD USA called Creative Libraries Utah: http://creativelibrariesutah.org/. | | I will be presenting: Perceptions of Public Libraries in the U.S. on Public Domain and Creative Commons, with Dr. Anne Arendt.


Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Painted Horse

11:15am

Write to Share; Real Remix Realized
Remix is the gold-standard of OER effectiveness, but technical barriers have made it hard to do, even when author-educators want to share their content and reuse and adapt high quality open resources. OERPUB has been working on an open-source editor to support creating rich open textbooks that can be remixed and shared. The editor supports editing mathematics, embedding multimedia, and is supportive of creating content that is accessible to learners with special needs. In addition to creating and testing the editor, we have been studying author behavior and are researching best practices for motivating author-educators to create semantically rich OER that is easy to share and remix. Co-presenter, Siyavula has been creating a full suite of open textbooks, adopted country-wide in South Africa, building a coordinated interactive and personalized practice service, and working with educators to adapt and translate OER.

We will be showing results of using the editor to create open textbooks and adapt and remix existing textbooks from Siyavula and Connexions. Teachers in South Africa are using the editor to create a custom textbook from existing Siyavula OER textbooks combined with teachers personal content, other open textbooks and resources, and rich media. We will be showing multiple versions of the editor used by Siyavula, Connexions, and OERPUB as well as other partners, highlighting the open-source nature and adaptability of the editor.

We will also be reporting on studies of how well authors understand the editor and what motivates them to create well structured documents. We are presenting several different motivations to authors and testing their effect on the content that authors create. This research is attempting to answer the question, which motivations and explanations are better at encouraging educators to create OER that is easier to remix, discover, and repurpose? The results of the research be broadly useful for designing tools for remix and training author-educators.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Arrowhead

11:15am

Using Open Badges and an Open Course to Enhance and Extend Learning
We will present our design for an open badge system currently in use in an undergraduate technology course for education majors. Our design is an attempt to use badges and an open online course to not only enhance student learning but also to encourage continued learning once our course has ended.

Theoretical Background
Open badges can provide a credential for learning that occurs in a non-traditional setting, a space in which few institutions are providing credentials. This makes open badges a textbook example of a disruptive innovation. However, since badges can also be used in a traditional setting, universities and other traditional credentialing institutions can adapt by using open badges to enhance their current course offers and encourage lifelong learning in a non-traditional setting.

Design of our Badges
By creating and issuing open badges, we hoped to not only motivate students to meet higher standards of learning, but also encourage students to continue learning after completing the course and thus extend our students? learning beyond our one-credit course. To this end, our badge system is multi-tiered, open to students not currently enrolled at our institution, and is integrated into an open online version of the course.

Inspired by Mozilla?s ?constellations? from the early designs for their webmaker.org badge system, we decided to graphically organize and group together the various technologies students could choose to learn. Our system had three different levels of badges. The lowest level consisted of badges with a small scope; the second tier of badges represented mastery of larger technologies and corresponded to major projects in the course; and the third badge level represented course-level mastery of all technologies and concepts taught in the course.

We created additional levels of badges beyond our course to provide a way for teachers to learn how to successfully integrate into actual teaching experiences the technologies they have previously learned in our class.

Design of the Open Online Course
To help our former students continue earning badges (as there are more badges available than are needed to complete the course), or any inservice teacher, we created an open online version of the course. By using asynchronous video discussions, currently enrolled students and inservice teachers can interact with each other and discuss class topics, real-world challenges inservice teachers are experiencing, and ways to use technology in their specific subject. We believe this approach will help our current students have a more authentic experience in learning and preparing to use these technologies and bring to their attention challenges facing current teachers. We believe inservice teachers will benefit by not only learning technologies and earning badges, but by discussing with our current students to gain insights from a younger demographic.

Current findings
We have just recently collected data from the first semester implementation, and in our presentation will share this data on how our implementation of the badges impacted student achievement and motivation.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Randall

Daniel Randall

Ph.D. Candidate, Brigham Young University
avatar for Rick West

Rick West

Associate professor, Brigham Young University
I study learning communities and how to assess/evaluate learning, performance, and innovation within a given community. Currently, I am researching Communities of Innovation, a framework for understanding group innovative processes, as well as techniques for improving online collaborative learning. I have also done research on K-16 technology integration strategies. I also study and develop open badges for preservice education (see... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
White Pine

11:15am

Large Scale OER - A TAACCCT Case Study
The $2 billion TAACCCT Grant program from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) requires grantees to make all the grant funded curricula and training materials they develop Open Educational Resources (OER) by licensing them with a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license (CC BY). Currently the TAACCCT program is the largest OER initiative in the world and uniquely focused on creating curricula in partnership with industry for credentials in vocational industry sectors like manufacturing, health, energy, transportation and IT.

The Open Professionals Education Network (OPEN) made up of Creative Commons, Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative, Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), and the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, through a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant, are providing free support and technical assistance to TAACCCT grantees. Assistance includes support for:

- licensing TAACCCT grant work with a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License
- finding and remixing OER
- open policy
- online learning and OER pedagogy, technology and authoring strategies
- incorporating principles of Universal Design for Learning
- ensuring deliverables are readily accessible to qualified individuals with disabilities
- developing and implementing online and technology-enabled courses using the Open Learning Initiative platform
- making use of learning analytics and data dashboards for continuous improvement and data-based decision making

This presentation will describe the TAACCCT program large scale OER initiative overall and results associated with OPEN?s work including:

- TAACCCT program priorities and requirements
- big picture view of grants made
- inter-institutional and inter-state agreements and consortia
- national outcomes, global benefits
- generating linkages for OER curricula in shared areas of study (eg. health, advanced manufacturing, energy, transportation, IT, etc.)
- evaluating and measuring success
- implementing similar programs elsewhere
- opportunities for others to tap in to TAACCCT OER


Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.
avatar for Mark  Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning and Open Education, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Kokopelli

11:15am

Siyavula: The impacts of our open culture when creating open resources
At Siyavula, we have our own 'open policy' in everything that we do, which feeds back into strengthening the impact of our work. This has been instrumental in our success. The broader community has responded strongly in support of us and our activities, something which we attribute primarily to our culture of openness, transparency and honesty.

Community building and collaborative authoring are key features of the Siyavula business plan and sustainability model. Anything that we produce with the community is made available under an open copy right license. This includes all the textbooks that have been produced using a collaborative authoring model with volunteers. We also believe in leading an open, transparent process in the creation and review of our open resources. We have found that this helps to build an open community around the resources and facilitates adoption of these resources.

The South African government has printed the Siyavula textbooks for the whole country for the past 2 years. This also provides a unique opportunity to start to educate the public about 'openness' through our use of strictly open source software in the production of the resources, as well as drawing on openly licensed videos and simulations with which the books are populated, and creating awareness about citizen science.

I will discuss how our open policy culture at Siyavula has started to impact the broader community in South Africa. From government level in that they are starting to see the benefits of open policy through our unique relationship with them, to educators who are learning about what they can use in their classrooms to create a stimulating environment, to the general public who now has the opportunity to become involved in and contribute to an open, transparent education project, and to the learners who are engaging with a 'living' resource.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Beckett

Megan Beckett

Lead Instructional Design, Siyavula
I very much believe in exploring the intersection of maths, science, art and design and the resulting possibilities once we break down the traditional barriers between these areas, and the barriers to education. I think this is especially true in engaging and inspiring young minds and making STEM education accessible and relevant. This can be achieved through innovative technology, inspired pedagogy and embracing an open, collaborative culture... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Painted Horse

11:45am

Studentsourcing OER: Leveraging Next Gen Content Creators
Student-sourced OER is anything that is assembled and put together by students which can be released under creative commons licenses for a particular course.

There are multiple benefits of leveraging students to create OER:
- As they prepare lesson materials, they actually analyze and synthesize the content and engage in using critical thinking skills.
- Teacher lesson prep is reduced, even if the student-created materials need to be refined before they can be used for the course.
- Cooperative learning takes place as collaboration on material helps create much stronger and engaging lessons.
- Certain students generally have the time, energy and technical ability to create materials that are directed at the target demographic - them!

It's much easier to find an OER lesson online, and revise/revamp it to fit standards of curriculum than it is to start from scratch writing curriculum and trying new things in a lesson. Materials created by students are a great starting point when the hunt for quality OER isn?t turning up results that fit perfectly with the standards that need to be taught.

It is important to note that materials that are created by students are not created by subject matter experts. The materials that are created can later be refined by the teacher, and reused and tweaked yearly to fit the growing need of the students for that particular year. However, students who are motivated to make these materials generally have highly-engaged personality types, are already intrinsically motivated in the course and turn in quality work for their projects and assignments.

This presentation will explore successful and not so successful strategies for motivating students to engage in creating OER lesson materials that allow them to leave their legacy in their favorite courses. These ideas include study sessions that generate OER study guides and FAQ databases, utilizing TAs to create OER review presentations and course materials, and even using student modeling on projects that can later be released as OER.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Webb

Ashley Webb

Electives Dept Chair & CTE Teacher, Mountain Heights Academy
Ashley Webb is a graduate of Brigham Young University, holding a Bachelor’s degree in Technology and Engineering Education. She holds Utah teaching endorsements in Multimedia, Commercial Art, Commercial Photography, IC3/Computer Technology, & Technology and Engineering Education (CTE/General). Her belief is that anyone can be taught how to use technology, regardless of age or brainpower. Some of her specialties include instructional and... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Arrowhead

11:45am

Building an Online Course with Badges: a Practical Guide
You're interested in incorporating badges into your course to engage and motivate students and to track achievement against learning milestones and outcomes. You?d also like to incorporate open badge publishing. This session will help with your success by preparing you to 1) plan for a blend of badges from human recognition as well as system recognition; 2) determine what types of system recognition you can and should leverage; 3) combine peer- and instructor-determined badges; and 4) plan appropriately for publishing to the Mozilla Open Badge Backpack. This session is intended to be quick and practical, leveraging a simple approach reflective of emerging best practices for first-timers.

Speakers
WW

Wade Weichel

Sr. Product Manager, Blackboard Learn, Blackboard


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
White Pine

11:45am

The TCC OER Project: How a College Built and Sustains an OER Adoption Initiative
Tacoma Community College is a college that has invested in OER. By hiring of a full-time OER Project Director, leveraging faculty development initiatives and promoting the use of OER across our curriculum our college has saved students a collective $266,000 in three academic quarters (September-June). While the project has made great strides in promoting the adoption of OER, our aim is to build a sustainable model that encourages the use of OER whenever and wherever most appropriate in our teaching and learning. This initiative has required the support of administrators, faculty, staff, and students. In this panel session people who have supported the TCC OER Project will discuss how the project was initiated, how it has grown, and how we are working to sustain OER as a regular part of our teaching and learning.

Speakers
avatar for Charlie Crawford

Charlie Crawford

Dean of Academic Services, Tacoma Community College
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Kokopelli

11:45am

OER Impact: Towards an Evidence Base
The open education movement has achieved much in the last decade, but there remains wide acknowledgement that the impact of OER has yet to be fully understood. A suggested approach is to address this through collective approaches that collate information and present them back in an integrated way. This has some appeal, particularly in the way it matches to ideals of openness, but needs to be implemented with care.

In this presentation I critically evaluate attempts that have been made to support communication and collaboration through ?mapping? OER. After endorsing the basic rationale for mapping evidence surrounding OER implementation I review two examples of where this has been attempted. The Open Learning Network (OLnet) Evidence Hub used the concept of ?Contested Collective Intelligence? to inform a discourse-centric social-semantic web application that could structure the discourses of the OER community. I provide a short critique of this approach which focuses on the data model and the metadata requirements made upon users. I go on to consider the UNESCO OER Mapping Project which set out some quite specific protocols for metadata (despite never getting beyond the prototype stage). The value of a ?mapping? approach is defended at the same time as noting that different audience will likely have very different needs in terms of evidence.

A rationale for a new, improved evidence hub is provided along with a number of design considerations and a proposal for future development. I conclude with a brief presentation of the new Evidence Hub being developed as part of the OER Research Hub (OERRH) project. I describe the ways in which our evidence model tries to overcome some of the issues which were manifest in these earlier projects, a range of different data sources, the importance of data visualization, and account for how different types of evidence might be flexibly accommodated. The final part of the session will be given over to group discussion about the idea of ?mapping? the OER evidence base and what the OER community might want from such services.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Fellow, OER Research Hub, The Open University, UK
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about... well, meet me at Open Ed 2014 to find out more...


Wednesday November 6, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Painted Horse

1:15pm

Repurposing OER through Learning by Design in Use
Open source software (OSS) projects can provide educators and learners with a good example of collaborative environment where they can contribute to an ongoing creative and investigative process centred on altering the OER in use. In OSS, there is no separation between design time, led by experts who design a complete application, and use time, led by end-users who evolve an artefact to meet unforeseen changes. Furthermore, design in use is inherently a process of learning by design, because interactions among participants and between participants and shared external artefacts provide the opportunity to contribute to design, learn something new, and evolve applications continuously. However, Many OER do not seem to offer users the ability to integrate their personal contexts into the content. This challenge raises the question of how to help educators and learners link design in use and learning by design when unanticipated issues arise from the use of OER. Educators may not have the experience and skills needed to adapt OER in a creative and investigative process. In this respect, it has been noted that educators may lack the time and skills needed to find, evaluate and repurpose resources, and that they need guidance on how to rethink their design processes to make better use of technologies. To address this challenge, I suggest an approach to evolutionary application development (EAD) to provide initial ideas for empowering educators and learners to contribute and participate more actively in the design process. EAD is a type of end-user development, which is defined as a set of methods and techniques that allow non-professional software developers to create or modify a software artifact. The rationale for end-user development rests in the need to organize development activities involving a diversity of users. Users can have different cultural, educational and employment backgrounds, include novices and experienced computer users, and young and mature individuals with different abilities and disabilities. A useful example of EAD is cloning. New components of an application can be developed by cloning an existing component that resembles what designers want to create or modify. An example of cloning applied to OER is the attempt made by the Peer-to-Peer University (P2PU) to provide users with a feature to clone existing courses. Cloning would allow users take a copy of and existing course offered by P2PU and start independent development on it, altering it or creating a new course. Cloning might offer educators and learners opportunities for reusing and re-purposing resources themselves, for example through remixing content from various sources Another useful example is the evolvement of a generic application for graphics drawing into kitchen design. Using tailoring tools built into the drawing application, an end-user can act as developer during use time and use the techniques for accessing, viewing, and modifying the user interface, the design rationale, and the program code of an application. By integrating an easy-to-use builder tool into it, an educational resource can arguably become a playground for alterations, keeping the process open to a wide range of contributions.

Speakers
avatar for Marisa Ponti

Marisa Ponti

Postdoc Researcher, University of Gothenburg and University of Oslo
Hi! I work as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Applied IT at the University of Gothenburg and I am a visiting researcher in InterMedia, Department of Educational Research, University of Oslo. | | I am interested in studying opportunities and challenges of open models – including open source, open educational resources (OER) and open licensing – to enhance forms of learning and knowledge creation mediated by emerging... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Arrowhead

1:15pm

Teaching Online Effectively
The Georgia Virtual Learning program is announcing an open online K-12 teacher training program that focuses on skills necessary to be successful instructor in the online environment. Five micro credentialed badge quests, including Participate, Navigate, Create, Evaluate, and Communicate, will be available in three pathways. These pathways include self-paced no credit, self-paced self-awarded, and paced/verified credentialing. The program will be in beta testing through the Fall and available on the web starting January of 2014. Open online teacher training will be created in a WordPress site with plug in supported by BadgeStack through Learning Times.

Speakers
TE

Tami Echard

Supervisor of Instructional Development, Georgia Virtual School
We will be starting our fourth year of OER Course development for 6-12 courses. We are starting an Elementary School Spanish Pilot program and will add some OER Resources for this level as well.
avatar for Jay Heap

Jay Heap

Director of Virtual Learning, Georgia Department of Education
Jay Heap currently serves as the Director of Virtual Learning for the State of Georgia. He has been involved with online learning including teaching, content development, and administration since 2005. He was instrumental in creating the Georgia Credit Recovery program, a free program available to all Georgia public school students. Serving as the Manager of Curriculum development for 2 years, he implemented a process for in house course... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
White Pine

1:15pm

Seamless & Frictionless Implementation of OERs in VLEs
Beyond discoverability and tagging of OERs, one of the biggest hurdles to OER integration into higher education is the linking of specific resources to learning outcomes, learners, activities, and assessment results in a virtual learning environment. The IMS Virtual App Store promises to provide the standards and APIs for universities, content publisher, and instructors to seamlessly and frictionlessly connect OERs to established curriculum maps. Learning Objects has published the Reference Implementation for the App Store, providing a blueprint for OER creators, publishers, and consumers to follow.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Kokopelli

1:15pm

Reclaiming the open learning environment
The delivery of open online learning has become a more common practice (or desired practice) in higher education in recent years. In many cases, the desire of an institution or an instructor to provide open educational experiences is not matched by the expertise and capacity available to support them. In this session, two diverse universities will share their lessons learned and ongoing challenges in delivering "xMOOCs", "cMOOCs" and open learning approaches that defy that distinction. The objective is to identify sharable and extensible tools, approaches and means of cooperation that will allow educators and learners to shape these experiences.

Last spring, The University of British Columbia (UBC) launched a research-informed xMOOC pilot through the Coursera consortium, with sign-ups for some of the pilot courses reaching six figures. At the same time, UBC has long embraced open learning projects through a robust MediaWiki and WordPress publishing framework that helped advance a broad range of open educational activities, including student produced OER and open courses. UBC?s embrace of both a self-maintained open infrastructure as well as emerging third party platforms is creating new potentials for open education at UBC.

Meanwhile Thompson Rivers University (TRU) has an ?Open Learning? division with a long history of providing open access post-secondary distance education (online and print) by offering continuous enrolment, flexible scheduling and minimal admission requirements, as well as extensive capacity for Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) and a well-established transfer credit system. It is working to enhance its capacity to support learning and public engagement via open platforms as well, via alignment with the Open Educational Resources university (OERu) and by working with UBC to adapt its MediaWiki and WordPress framework for its own needs. It is also piloting open online courses based on the distributed/syndicated framework modeled by #DS106, #ETMOOC, among others.

The co-facilitators of this session assert that it is vital for educators to be meaningful in their intentions for open learning environments, or risk have having their intentions shaped by others. In addition to discussing their lessons learned, this session hopes to prompt a discussion on the enhanced cooperation that is needed -- whether it be by formal ?shared services? arrangements supported by organizations such as BCcampus, or by more emergent forms of sharing such as an open platform co-op.

Speakers
avatar for Will Engle

Will Engle

Strategist, Open Education Initiatives, The University of British Columbia
Teaching and Learning Centre Staff
avatar for Jim Groom

Jim Groom

Co-Founder, Reclaim Hosting
I like long walks on the internet, Italian b-grade horror films, and ds106 (#4life). I worked at University of Mary Washington for almost a decade doing instructional technology, and my partner Tim Owens and I have been running the web hosting company Reclaim Hosting for more than 2 years now, and it is insanely fun and cool to be creating something as we go. My professional interests are open education, digital identity and distributed... Read More →
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director Innovation, Thompson Rivers University
I'm most interested in: | | * a vision of open education in which open practices and open technologies are at least as important as OER. | | * a vision of higher educational institutions that embraces their mandate as stewards of knowledge and inquiry. To me that means more permeable boundaries, more engagement with the wider world, and a renewed commitment to public service in learning. | | * playing the drums at the jam... Read More →
avatar for Tim Owens

Tim Owens

Co-Founder, Reclaim Hosting
I'm a total hack.
avatar for Novak Rogic

Novak Rogic

Web Strategy Manager, CTLT - UBC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogic


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Painted Horse

1:45pm

OER as Content, OER as Pedagogy: Empowering Students as Partners in Learning Using Scholarly Open Access Resources
Lawrence Lessig astutely observed that for all of human history culture was "read-write" where people participated in creation and re-creation. It is 20th century analog technologies "broadcast news and radio, vinyl records" that deliver the anomaly of "efficient consumption, but inefficient amateur production," resulting in a "read only" passive, consuming culture. The Internet has provided a major disruption, relentlessly returning us to our "read-write" roots. So what does this mean for instruction?

In spring 2010 the Business Division at Paradise Valley Community College approached the Buxton Library for assistance to curate open source content that could take the place of costly textbooks. A robust collaboration soon evolved that transcended OER as mere content replacement. In light of Lessig?s insights about the Millennial Generation?s ?read-write? renaissance, this project unleashed a paradigm shift in which students responded to course lectures not with rote memory, but as curators who by researched, evaluated, and mixed relevant digital content into their own ?living textbook.?

This presentation addresses the nuts and bolts of this collaboration that integrated embedded information literacy instruction, proprietary and open access content, Blackboard software, 2.0 tools, and team-based learning into a student-driven model of ?read-write? learning. Working in cooperative based learning groups, students researched relevant and timely information rooted in course lectures and assembled their findings in a wiki-based ?living textbook? replete with images, videos, and peer feedback. Each week student teams presented their findings to the class with instructor comments peppered throughout. Students mastered IBS101 course objectives as well as ancillary 21st Century skills including digital research, peer teaching, public speaking, and team building.

Referring to digital creativity Lessing notes, "This is the life our kids push for. They demand it . . . We can't make them passive again.? Findings from this project affirm the efficacy of OER as a ?read-write? pedagogy where 100% of students strongly agreed or agreed that instructors encouraged critical thinking and problem solving; 95% found content for this course more engaging than a traditional textbook; and, 76% strongly agreed or agreed that information literacy instruction provided by faculty librarians assisted in their creation the ?living textbook?.
Presentation Outline (includes video clips of actual class)

1. Project Background (5 minutes)
2. The Faculty Experience, Reyes Medrano (10 minutes): 30 year veteran instructor shares his transformation in teaching with an OER pedagogy
3. The Faculty Librarian?s Role, Kande Mickelsen and Sheila Afnan-Manns (10 minutes): Nuts and bolts of embedded information literacy instruction and technology platforms utilized
4. The Student Perspective: Video (10 minutes): Prohibitive cost of textbooks, reaching more than one learning style, impact on student engagement
5. Conclusion (15 minutes): Survey findings, success factors, adapting this approach to other courses and academic disciplines, Q&A

Handouts: Lessig article on read-write generation, Oneclick Digital© framework, IBS101 OER LibGuide, IBS101 student handouts on creating a wiki, persistent links, information literacy instruction, etc.

Speakers
SA

Sheila Afnan-manns

Faculty Librarian, Scottsdale Community College
Information, Digital Culture, Student Success


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Arrowhead

1:45pm

Badge-Empowered Learning
Georgia Virtual Learning is developing a series of online professional development programs using BadgeOS, a powerful open source platform for rewarding learner achievement and community engagement and issuing digital micro-credentials [digital badges]. The session will explore options available through BadgeOS for designing, issuing and displaying micro-credentials at any organization. Some of the features available with BadgeOS include customizable implementations, extensive knowledge and community triggers for recognizing achievements and social contributions, and the idea of building an iTunes like open source badge and content library. Digital micro-credentials issued through BadgeOS are compliant with Mozilla Open Badge (OBI) standards and are opening up new job opportunities, exposing new learning pathways, and helping connect people with communities where they can have an impact and where their skills and experience are valued and needed. Digital micro-credentials can be issued to anyone ? in the elementary school setting to the corporate setting to people engaged and committed to lifelong learning.

Speakers
TE

Tami Echard

Supervisor of Instructional Development, Georgia Virtual School
We will be starting our fourth year of OER Course development for 6-12 courses. We are starting an Elementary School Spanish Pilot program and will add some OER Resources for this level as well.
avatar for Jay Heap

Jay Heap

Director of Virtual Learning, Georgia Department of Education
Jay Heap currently serves as the Director of Virtual Learning for the State of Georgia. He has been involved with online learning including teaching, content development, and administration since 2005. He was instrumental in creating the Georgia Credit Recovery program, a free program available to all Georgia public school students. Serving as the Manager of Curriculum development for 2 years, he implemented a process for in house course... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
White Pine

1:45pm

Maximizing the value of your OER with eduCommons
Develop metadata, search strategies, presentation optimizations, all over your valuable resources with the latest tools and techniques, that expands outreach while letting you focus directly on your content.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Kokopelli

1:45pm

UNESCO/COL OER Chair Report on activities
The UNESCO Chair in OER programme (and the Comonwealth of Learning partners) are focused on strengthening networking, building capacity and promoting research related to the international Open Educational Resources movement. It will be supported by the strong commitment of the four UNESCO Chairholders in OER:
? Fred Mulder, Open University of the Netherlands;
? Wayne Mackintosh, Otago Polytechnic, New Zealand;
? Tel Amiel, UNICAMP, Brazil; and
? Rory McGreal, Athabasca University, Canada).

They are committed to opening access to education and knowledge, and will build from the ongoing interaction and work of the OER Community. This international group resulted from a Hewlett sponsored project at UNESCO to raise awareness of Open Educational Resources worldwide, and a UNESCO Chair, with its function as a think tank and a bridge builder, is the ideal base from which to ensure the sustainability of international interaction on the topic while maintaining a link to UNESCO and its priorities. Broadly, the Chairs in OER promote action at the institutional, national and international levels, and they ensure information sharing within the network and among the international OER community institutions.

The initial international focus is to build on the OER Community and complement it with the formation of an international OER Network,. Importantly, this action will engage the entire network of UNESCO Chairs. Outputs this past year include forming an international OER Graduate Network; maintaining, building the OER Knowledge Cloud, pblishing with COL, an edited book of scholarly research on OER, and planning and adapting the International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning (IRRODL) as a scholarly journal focusing more on OER for information sharing and dissemination.

The common Plan of Action has been updated and extended on its main lines of action. In this session we will report on the running activities:

1 The Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN) has successfully started its operation. Currently there are 13 PhD candidates, around 30 experts for supervision, and 15 institutional partners. GO-GN is being funded partly by the Dutch Ministry of Education; other funding sources, including scholarship opportunities, are anticipated.

2 The OER Knowledge Cloud is continuously loaded with relevant new (and existing) publications (scientific and for a broader audience) and reports on OER. It is accessible to anyone and meanwhile is a rich source for all workers in the OER field.
3 The global OER mapping initiative (from Susan D?Antoni) got into an online discussion in November 2012, the primary objective being to explore whether the OER community could collaborate to build a world map of projects.

4 The OERuniversity is steadily developing with more partners endorsing the OERu concept and plan, including some funding support. The OERu pilot courses which are under development incorporate a number of MOOC-like features.

Apart from these focus areas there is involvement of at least one UNESCO Chair in OER (and sometimes more) with international organizations such as COL, OECD, EU, ICDE, OCWC, EADTU, ACDE, AAOU, and others.


Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Painted Horse

2:30pm

OER for Foreign Language Learning: The Case of Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick
OER for Foreign Language Learning: The Case of Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick

This presentation recounts the development and impact of Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick, two large-scale OER produced by the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin. COERLL is one of 15 National Foreign Language Resource Centers funded by the US Department of Education. COERLL?s mission is to improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages by producing open resources (OER and best practices) that can be profitably employed in a variety of K-16 settings. More specifically, this presentation focuses on COERLL?s efforts to shift foreign language educators away from the traditional literacy practices associated with print textbooks towards the innovative practices of multimodal discourse associated with digital materials.

The need for pedagogical materials that accurately represent foreign languages has never been greater. And yet, commercial publishers are still wary of including non-standard speech for fear of losing market share. Tired of traditional textbooks that represented an idealized version of the foreign language, COERLL developers videotaped French and German as it is used in real-life situations. These videos formed the basis for Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick. Since the goal of the videos was to capture authentic samples of native and non-native speech, no attempt was made to alter the language. Consequently, both OER accord a place of privilege to bilingual speakers who exhibit a wide range of proficiencies: from balanced bilinguals to so-called ?incipient? bilinguals (i.e., American students learning French or German). Akin to complete, online courses for beginners, Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick are characterized by an innovative development process that included:

? iterations of usability testing and formative evaluation;
? non-standard language varieties ignored by commercial publishers;
? user-generated content from teachers and learners.

Surveys and focus groups revealed that the modular design of Français interactif and Deutsch im Blick presented significant challenges for instructors who were used to a traditional textbook?s linear format and integration of vocabulary, grammar, and thematics. To overcome this problem, all learning objects in each chapter were labeled either by media type (e.g., video, audio, print, Internet link) or by pedagogical category (e.g., vocabulary, phonetics, grammar, culture). In addition to several hours of multimedia content, both OERs feature a printed ?textbook? of activities for the classroom. The textbook is available as a free, downloadable PDF or as a print-on-demand textbook that may be purchased for less than $30. Finally, the OERs? flexible design facilitates the movement between online and offline environments that is the hallmark of blended language learning. Students prepare online content as homework that is recycled and expanded upon in small group classroom activities. Usage statistics show that both OER are in widespread use in high schools and colleges around the world.

Speakers
avatar for Carl S. Blyth

Carl S. Blyth

Director, Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning
avatar for Garin Fons

Garin Fons

Projects Manager, Center for Open Educational Resources & Language Learning


Wednesday November 6, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Arrowhead

2:30pm

Pulling OER Into The Classroom With EdReady
EdReady is a personalized learning application from NROC that directs students, especially those at risk of math remediation, to the resources they need to be ready for college. EdReady development and refinement continues, but EdReady has already been piloted at a number of sites across the country, spanning a variety of use-cases including:
- high-school classrooms (for differentiated instruction)
- online students (including hybrid classrooms, for both advanced and remedial study)
- HS graduates matriculating to college (for assessment and improvement of college readiness)
- developmental education students in college (as stand-alone, accelerated, or co-requisite remediation approaches)

EdReady is available to anyone via a free, public site with national coverage, or via customized, institutional versions for specific populations or purposes. In all cases, EdReady offers the opportunity for appropriate educational resources, especially OER, to be surfaced for students according to their specific needs. In other words, resources are only recommended in an academic context that makes sense to each student, so much of the guesswork regarding the appropriateness and utility of discovered resources has been eliminated.

For the public version of EdReady, resources are considered for potential inclusion in the resource pool (also called the EdReady Marketplace) according to open and transparent educational, legal, and technical criteria, and we welcome suggestions from the field even as we continue to scan for new offerings as they arise. For the custom versions of EdReady, resources are also available as required by the sponsoring institution. Thus, EdReady offers a pathway for OER adoption by students, teachers, and administrators that lessens the scale-up challenge that has stymied most OER projects to date.

Speakers
avatar for Ahrash Bissell

Ahrash Bissell

Manager - EdReady, The NROC Project
Ahrash Bissell manages the development of EdReady, a personalized learning platform with an initial focus on math. The NROC Project (also known as the Monterey Institute for Technology and Education) is a community-guided, non-profit effort focused on new models for OER development, distribution, and use. EdReady provides a turnkey pathway for institutions to resolve long-standing and significant readiness challenges by leveraging OER... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Kokopelli

2:30pm

OERs Rule, MOOCs DROOL: MOOCs and DistRibuted Open Online Learning
The "wrapped MOOC" has gained attention over the past year as a way to integrate MOOCs into traditional education. This presentation will present results of interviews with practitioners of this method to show that in practice most educators are not "wrapping" the cohort experience, but are instead using the MOOC as robust OER. This trend is discussed in terms of ?distributed flip? and ?distributed blend? models, as well as David Wiley?s joking but correct observation that MOOCs are distraction from the potential of DROOL (DistRibuted Open Online Learning). Implications include a hidden but high demand for robust, course-level OER, and the possible desirability of approaching blended learning from the online experience ?backwards?, as opposed to the traditional model which emphasizes the online refitting of an existing or assumed face-to-face experience.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
White Pine

2:30pm

Seeding an Open Culture at a Research University
Building openness requires creating awareness and solving problems within projects. MSUglobal is a unique unit at a research university. MSUglobal is an innovative thought leader and a partner with many faculty on their research projects. It creates synergies through optimizing open source technologies and open education resources. It is also leveraging the movement toward open research. To build a community which values these methods, faculty training and staff use of open tools are a minimum. The real success comes from having highly successful projects. For MSU, several projects fit that criteria and have provided a base to build this culture. Food Safety Knowledge Network has used OER and a open platform to provide continual service to World Bank selected countries. MSU faculty reuse materials, translate them to locale languages, offer online assessments and have a partner network which helps with on ground support. Continual development of the platform means we are redeploying the platform to integrate AgriDrupal features which provide for rich metadata to enhance harvesting.
MSUglobal is leading development on a Food Fraud MOOC, using moodle as a pilot to maintain open access. Yet another project is continual development of a Metropolitan Agriculture MOOC launched over a year ago which uses OER and WordPress to share resources and developments in the emerging international field. Another pilot with the World Bank, is focusing on practitioners developing skills to help women in agriculture. These open modules will be launched in the summer. All of these projects have built an increasing network of faculty willing to use OER for research and projects. This effort requires staff that can help faculty work through the issues of openness. Furthermore, it requires staff staying current on open source tools. To change the culture at large institution takes time and effort.

Speakers
avatar for Gwyn Shelle

Gwyn Shelle

Michigan State University


Wednesday November 6, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Painted Horse

3:00pm

Open video corpora for language learning: the SpinTX Corpus-to-Classroom project
This presentation will introduce the SpinTX Corpus-to-Classroom project, a collaborative effort among foreign language educators, linguists, and technologists at COERLL and the University of Texas at Austin. The goal of the project is to leverage open video corpora and linguistic data for the development of Open Educational Resources (OER) for language learning. The presentation will discuss the project?s main results to date: (1) a pedagogically-friendly web interface to search a collection of transcribed and annotated video clips from the Spanish in Texas Corpus; (2) tools and templates facilitating the creation of Open Educational Resources (OER) using the corpus; (3) an open source model for developing and adapting video corpora for pedagogical use.

The first result of the project is the launch of the SpinTX video archive, a pedagogically-friendly web interface to an open Spanish language video corpus. The archive currently contains hundreds of openly-licensed videos and transcripts from the Spanish in Texas Corpus, a collection of interviews with Spanish speakers living in Texas. These videos provide authentic samples of the Spanish language that American students are likely to encounter in their everyday lives, thus making them useful as authentic oral texts for the teaching of foreign languages. Each of the videos is accompanied by a complete transcript that has been annotated with thematic, grammatical, functional and metalinguistic information as well as synchronized closed captions. Using SpinTX, educators are able to search and tag the videos for features that match their interests, and share favorite videos in playlists.

The second result is a set of online templates and models for creating Open Educational Resources (OER) using video from the corpus. The presenters will describe the collaboration with educators to develop methodologies for the creation of activities and lessons using authentic video. Moreover, they will describe how educators are reusing and remixing OER developed using the SPinTX materials.

The final result of the project is the development of tools and methodologies for researchers and educators interested in creating or adapting their own video corpora for language learning. The presenters will demonstrate how it is possible to use a combination of open source software and open APIs and to construct a linguistically-annotated video corpus suitable for pedagogical applications. Documentation of development processes and custom open source code is provided through the project development blog and code repository.

Project Links:
Spanish in Texas: http://www.spanishintexas.org
SpinTX Video Archive: http://www.spintx.org
COERLL (Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning) http://coerll.utexas.edu


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Arrowhead

3:00pm

Providing incentives for OER adoption in the Virginia Community College System
The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) dedication to increasing the success of its students is reflected in its ambitious six-year plan, Achieve 2015, as well as through a number of important and ongoing reengineering efforts. One significant barrier to the success of its students is the rising costs of college, especially the cost of course materials. Reducing the cost of textbooks and other course materials not only makes college more affordable but also increases the likelihood that students will succeed.

The VCCS is actively working to reduce textbook costs for its students by supporting several innovative initiatives. In 2012, the Reengineering Task Force assembled a Textbook Costs and Digital Learning Resources Work Group to develop recommendations for reducing textbook costs across the system. In addition, several colleges were awarded mini-grants to develop open educational resources for a handful of high enrollment courses on their campuses. Tidewater Community College?s OpenTCC is the first college in the nation to offer a degree?an Associates in Business Admin?with no textbook costs. The VCCS has also joined other public, post-secondary institutions in the Commonwealth to establish and sponsor the inaugural Open & Digital Learning Resources Conference (openva.org) in order to build awareness of innovative OER initiatives at 2- and 4-year institutions across the state.

Despite these efforts, more needed to be done. To that end, the Chancellor invited proposals from faculty of high enrollment VCCS courses to help reduce course costs for their students by adopting free, openly-licensed materials (such as an open textbook, free digital resource, etc.) for their course. Twelve proposals were selected to receive a $3000 Chancellor?s OER Adoption Grant to identify, review, and customize existing high quality OER to incorporate as the only required material in the course. During the spring and summer of 2013, the grant cohort worked under the guidance OER experts to identify open resources, verify the licensing of selected resources, and develop high-quality courses. These courses are currently being piloted by the grantees at their home colleges.

This presentation will describe the opportunities and challenges of this effort, some initial outcomes of the project, how effectively this project synced with the other OER efforts taking place throughout the VCCS.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream
Dr. Richard Sebastian is the Director of Achieving the Dream's OER Degree Initiative, an effort to support colleges across the United States in designing degree programs using open educational resources. | | Before joining ATD, Richard was the Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies for the Virginia Community College System, providing vision, leadership, and support for effective use of teaching and learning technologies for the 23... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Kokopelli

3:00pm

Teach a MOOC ? What are you, crazy?
If you've ever actually taught an online course, the thought of teaching a MOOC sounds like an absolutely crazy idea. It's hard to get past the idea that you might be multiplying all your ?online student? headaches by a factor of 100 or 1000. Well, those were my first thoughts about it too. However, what I learned was that teaching a MOOC has been the purest and most fun form of teaching and learning that I?ve ever done. Teaching a MOOC is a complete paradigm shift from traditional education in terms of the design, the assessment requirements, and the diversity of students. As the manager of courses for Canvas Network, we?ve learned a lot about how to design a good online course for students who struggle with English, span all the time zones in the world, and have very different learning goals. In this talk I will share my own teaching experiences and surprises and some of these design tips from our MOOC courses.

Speakers

Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
White Pine

3:00pm

Turning GOV into OER: The eLangdell Press Experience
Christopher Columbus Langdell, professor at the Harvard Law School in the 19th Century,, developed the case law method of legal education, a method that continues to this day. In it, law students learn the law by reading court cases that interpret it. The eLangdell Press was conceived as a way to bring this method into the 21st century by creating open casebooks. After all, law is public domain material, and there are plenty of open source tools available to create the OER materials, so it should be relatively easy, right?

Wrong.

This session will detail the experience of the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction staff?s quest to open up the Legal Textbook system. Topics covered will include the challenges faced with working with government and legal information, the unique issues of the legal academe, and the best practices we?ve developed in creating our casebooks.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Glassmeyer

Sarah Glassmeyer

Director of Community Development, CALI
Open Source, FOSS, Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Data, Being Awesome, Cats, eBooks, Open Law, Free Law, Libraries, Library, Information Literacy, Twitter, Blogs, Blogging, Cupcakes, Rabble Rousing, Coffee, Educational Technology, EdTech, Making lists of my interests, Legal Research, LRW, Open Education, OER, OPEN EVERYTHING, access to justice, long walks on the beach, pina coladas, getting caught in the rain., DISLIKES: The Man
avatar for Elmer Masters

Elmer Masters

Director of Technology, CALI
Drupal, Wordpress, Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP, Free Law, Open Education Resources


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Painted Horse

3:30pm

Narrative inquiry into K12 teachers' change in classroom practices
According to educational philosopher Dewey (1933) ?we are all knowers who reflect on experience, confront the unknown, make sense of it, and take action?. Johnson & Golombek (2002) argue that teachers? reflections can be viewed as mechanisms for change: as teachers construct their own explanations of teaching, they create knowledge and use that knowledge within the contexts of their classrooms, gradually rethinking their pedagogical practices. Understanding these reflections from the teachers? perspective is important to understand teachers as agents of change.
During the course of the Hewlett-funded OER Research Project and in collaboration with the Flipped Learning Network and Vital Signs, one of Gulf of Maine Research Institute science programs, reflective stories were collected from K12 teachers engaged in reusing, revising, remixing and redistributing open educational resources. In this presentation I explore these narratives as indicators of change in teachers? classroom practices and pedagogies.

Speakers
avatar for Bea de los Arcos

Bea de los Arcos

Research Associate, The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Researching the impact of OER on teaching and learning practices with colleagues at the OER Research Hub Project; leading the project's collaboration with educational programs in the K12 sector. |  


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Arrowhead

3:30pm

The Maricopa Millions Project: Scaling Up OER to Save Students Money and Increase Access
The Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) is a large community college district, consisting of ten autonomous colleges. The MCCCD plans to scale OER usage throughout the district by remixing and adapting current models of implementation from across the nation. To this end, a task force and steering committee have been established to develop and implement a comprehensive strategic plan to accomplish the goal of saving our students $5 million over 5 years in course materials. The project includes a strategic, sustainable OER infrastructure consisting of building awareness, professional development opportunities for faculty, technical support, marketing, and technical structure. The project will help create a culture that actively encourages, supports, and sustains the use of OER for all course levels across all ten colleges. The course materials will be a mix and adaptation of existing OER course materials as well as development of new content. Our district leaders are committed to OER and the potential it holds to improve student access to materials. Participants attending this session will learn about the beginnings of MCCCD adoption of OER, the Maricopa Millions plan and what has been done to date to achieve this goal.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Golisch

Paul Golisch

Dean, Information Technology, Paradise Valley Community College
I want students in developmental math courses to be successful in achieving their academic goals without paying for textbooks or online homework programs. I also want them to have some fun and get to know other students as they move through the math course sequence.
avatar for James Sousa

James Sousa

Math Faculty, Phoenix College
As a math instructor, I enjoy helping students reach their goals and improve their lives. I believe a part of this is providing students quality instructional resources free or at a very low cost. | | | | Personally, I enjoy early morning exercise, staying active, and making the most of each day.
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. | | I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional needs, and/or providing open educational resources to eliminate barriers to access and provide more relevant and useful learning materials


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Kokopelli

3:30pm

Is There Anybody Out There? Communication Tools for OER Practitioners
Originally known only to a small community of familiar faces, open educational resources are taking the academic world by storm. This newfound popularity has left a burgeoning global community seeking new modes of communication. How are we talking to each other, and the outside world, about the resources we are creating and using? This session surveys recent projects seeking to unify an OER community online, and examines the digital communication tools ? open and closed ? most commonly used.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Frank Bristow

Sara Frank Bristow

Founder, Lead Researcher, Salient Research LLC
Sara is an education researcher and consultant in global K-12 and higher education, with an emphasis on blended and online education (policy and practice), OER, and the use of wikis as educational tools. Clients and collaborators include the OER Research Hub (The Open University), the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), Evergreen Education Group, CompetencyWorks, Wiki Strategies, The University of Mississippi, and KMDI... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Painted Horse

3:30pm

Emancipating Learning: Journey to the MOOC and Beyond
Some may think that Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a fad, but they are raising some interesting questions about the scalability, accessibility and quality of online learning, as well as new thoughts about the higher education landscape. While a number of institutions have started to offer MOOCs, many are still wondering if and how to participate, as well as how these learning experiences relate to other online teaching and learning plans.
Are your institutional leaders tasking you what finding out more and determining what they should do about MOOCs? Are you wondering if and how you should get started? Are you curious about what it is like to develop and facilitate a MOOC and if it's worth the effort? Whether you?ve run a MOOC or are considering running one, this participants on the panel will provide the perspective and journey of three institutions which have run one more MOOCs: Cuyahoga Community College; State University of New York; and University of Illinois Springfield; on their MOOC journey. They will share insights, best practices, pitfalls and research results.

- Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) recently became the first community college in the nation to launch a MOOC -- free online classes to help students of all ages, including high school students preparing for college readiness, middle-aged workers returning to college to prepare for a new career and to middle-school students working ahead at Pre-Algebra pass developmental math, also known as remedial math, before they enter college. This course was developed using an innovative design to improve student engagement. The MOOC leverages game mechanics to motivate students? progress through the course. Sandy Moses and Sasha Thackaberry will provide highlights of the design, development and delivery process, along with results of their data analysis into course activity and student performance.

- State University of New York (SUNY) is hosting an open community course on Open Educational Resources and members of the team who designed the course will discuss the collaborative project. The team includes SUNY faculty, librarians, and instructional designers from several campuses who worked on the creation of an open course on OER designed for SUNY faculty and staff. The project has been designed to build critical thinking skills needed for creating, selecting, and evaluating open educational resources in the context of the online environment

- University of Illinois Springfield held a MOOC entitled "The Emancipation Proclamation: What Came Before, How It Worked, and What Followed" in early 2013. This was the second MOOC offered by UIS, following the eduMOOC of Fall 2011. Ray Schroeder, Michele Gribbins, Carrie Levin and Emily Boles will share their experiences and lessons learned in developing and delivering the MOOCs. Discussions will range from the effectiveness of technologies and activities used in the two MOOCs to insights from students regarding their motivation for participating in the MOOCs.

Speakers
avatar for Jarl Jonas

Jarl Jonas

Director, Product Management & CourseSites at Blackboard, Blackboard
Educator and life-long learner excited about the use of technology to enhance student engagement and achievement. I currently serve as the Director for CourseSites by Blackboard, a free, hosted online course creation and facilitation service for individual instructors. I also am an adjust faculty member for Excelsior College teaching Business Communications and am a former Secondary Language Arts teacher. I look forward to meeting everyone and... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
White Pine
 
Thursday, November 7
 

9:00am

KEYNOTE: Audrey Watters
Audrey Watters is a journalist, a high school dropout, and a PhD dropout – though she did complete a Master’s degree in Folklore. As a freelancer writing about educational technology, her stories have appeared on NPR/KQED’s MindShift blog, in O’Reilly Radar, on Inside Higher Ed, in The School Library Journal, on ReadWriteWeb, and in the Edutopia blog.

Speakers
AW

Audrey Watters

Hack Education
Audrey Watters is a journalist specializing in education technology news and analysis. She has worked in the education field for the past 15 years: as a graduate student, college instructor, program manager for an ed-tech non-profit. Although she was two chapters into a dissertation in comparative literature, she decided to eschew the professor track for a different path, and she now happily fulfills the one job recommended to her by a junior... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 9:00am - 9:40am
Kokopelli

9:45am

KEYNOTE: David Kernohan
David Kernohan is a Programme Manager for e-Learning at Jisc. He works on online and open education there, having managed a range of major initiatives including the Open Education Resources programme. He also has an expertise in English Higher Education policy and global HE trends, having previously worked for HEFCE as a policy analyst.

Speakers

Thursday November 7, 2013 9:45am - 10:10am
Kokopelli

10:45am

OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis
The average U.S. college student spends more than $1,000 per year on textbooks and supplies, a significant expense on top of already burdensome college costs. Textbook prices continue to soar four times faster than inflation, and many commonly-used texts cost over $200 a piece. The U.S. market is estimated at $8.8 billion, with just five publishers in control of the vast majority of sales.

Open textbooks and OER offer a compelling and common-sense solution to these challenges, and for the last six years, the Student PIRGs and other advocacy groups have worked to win support for OER through this lens.

The potential is huge: With today's rapidly changing student preferences, open textbooks could revolutionize the way textbooks are bought and sold - the full text is offered free online, low-cost hard copies can be sold in the bookstore, and a wide range of print and digital formats are available online. This virtually eliminates affordability concerns while enabling all students to have unfettered access to the text starting the first day of the course.

This session will provide a campaign update from the front lines of the textbook affordability front, focusing on how much progress OER has made as a solution. This will include the latest developments in the public debate around textbook costs, new research quantifying OER savings, analysis of how the publishers are responding, and specific recommendations for how audience members can join or further the cause.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e


Thursday November 7, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
White Pine

10:45am

Outcomes of an Australian study to develop an OER Feasibility Protocol: A framework to assist implementation and adoption
Data informing the protocol was collected from four key sources: an online survey distributed to stakeholders across the higher education sector in Australia; interviews with key participants; analysis of the online publically available Intellectual Property policies of Australian universities; and a OER National Symposium held in Sydney which gathered insights and feedback from a diverse range of stakeholders across the higher education sector.
The Feasibility Protocol prompts questions on four aspects visually illustrated in Figure 1. These aspects are:
? The Opportunities involved with the adoption of OER;
? Factors related to the Challenges associated with the adoption of OER;
? Strategic Directions that need to be considered for an effective adoption of OER; and
? Policy Recommendations for higher education institutions in Australia
With the exception of Policy Recommendations, the aspects of the protocol are subdivided into three levels: the first level is focused on the higher education sector, the second level is related to organisational issues and the third concentrates on individual levels, including staff and students within educational organisations. The Policy Recommendations focus on organisational, project and individual levels.
We believe that the Feasibility Protocol is a valuable instrument that could encourage and facilitate further adoption of OER and OEP, not only in higher and distance learning institutions in Australia, but also worldwide.




Thursday November 7, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Kokopelli

10:45am

Open to be Qualified
Students are often faced with the difficult question of how to match their academic credentials and their life experiences with potential jobs. A new tool from Qualified enables potential students to submit a summary of their background, which is then evaluated, in order to dynamically identify and document their career-based experience and academic experience. This information is then used to develop a skill-based profile. This profile can then be used to evaluate possible fits to job listings, identify skill gaps between current and desired positions, and recommend courses that directly address these gaps.

This process allows potential students in today?s workforce to better understand how their own skills and background fit with their dream jobs. Qualified measures each course in terms of skills, and directs prospective students to classes and programs they are missing in order to reach their career choice. The student is provided with numerous options to help them reach their goal. Qualified is committed to providing open access and coordination with all open educational resource providers. Thus, options are not restricted to any one school or program.

Further, this tool is designed to assist employers as well, in that its aim is to assure that potential employees are career-driven and qualified for the offered position. The goal is to help employers spend less time learning about an applicants? background, and more time developing their employees potential! Additionally, it gives employers the opportunity to help current employees evaluate their current skills and then match them with open education resources, in order to continue to grow and develop as professionals. Another service that Qualified will provide is a data bank that will allow students to see available positions.

Speakers
JI

John Ittelson

Professor, CSU Monterey Bay
PS

Peter Smith

Senior Vice President - Academic Strategies and De, Kaplan University
Peter Smith has been leading innovation in higher education domestically and internationally for over 40 years. Founder and first president of two colleges, the Community College of Vermont (1970) and California State University, Monterey Bay (1995), Peter has also served as the Dean of the Graduate School of Education at George Washington University and as the Assistant Director General for Education at UNESCO in Paris, France. Smith is... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Painted Horse

10:45am

Creative Commons Update: Education, Policy, 4.0 Licenses, etc.
Cable Green, CC?s Director of Global Learning, will provide an update on major projects at Creative Commons including: Open Policy Network, School of Open, 4.0 licenses, new CC products and technologies, outcomes from the 2013 CC Global Summit, and CC Education?s 2014 draft strategy. Half of the time will be reserved for feedback and discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.


Thursday November 7, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Arrowhead

11:15am

The CC-OLI Evaluation Report

Since 2002, Carnegie Mellon University’s Open Learning Initiative has taken a science-based approach to the creation and improvement of open, online courses that have demonstrably improved learner outcomes and improved educational productivity.  The Community College Open Learning Initiative (CC-OLI) has been a multi-year effort to build upon the success of that approach by targeting community college courses with high enrollment and low success rates.   Teams of community college faculty have joined in this community-based research project for the development, dissemination and evaluation of 4 gatekeeper courses, all with the goal of increasing student success by 25%.  Faculty from hundreds of institutions have now been involved in the development, use and evaluation of courses in Statistics, Anatomy Physiology, Biology and Psychology.

 This session will offer an overview of the results of the CC-OLI project, presenting results from the formal evaluation study, as well as lessons learned in the development, improvement, dissemination and study of these courses.  Specific topics include:

 A review of the course development process—how do we scale multi-institution, team-based course creation?

 A look at dissemination – how do we promote adoption of these and other OER?

 A discussion of faculty use – what can be done to best support faculty in successfully incorporating these types of materials into their practice?

 Evaluation study results – where and how were the courses and tools effective in contributing to student and faculty success?

 Recommendations for future studies– what have we learned about the challenge evaluation work in this context?

 The future – what’s next for the Open Learning Initiative?


Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
White Pine

11:15am

Global Open Textbook Projects - Pathways to Adoption
In this session, leaders of 5 open textbook projects, a student advocate of open policy and a global leader in open policy will describe the adoption efforts undertaken by each of their projects and organizations. Each group has spent considerable efforts encouraging and advocating for adoption, and the details of those efforts will be described. In addition, the groups will speak to their methods for collecting adoption data, and to actual adoption of their content to date. In addition, the broader context of adoption and collaboration across the Commons will be discussed with a view to understanding how the development of collaborative relationships can help drive reuse and higher quality instructional resources.

Mary Burgess of the BC Open Textbook Project will discuss how she and her team are working to produce 40 Open Textbooks on a restricted budget and tight timeline. She will describe their work engaging faculty and student groups across the British Columbia Post Secondary System, efforts to make adoption and reuse easier for those groups, and how adoptions are being tracked.

Cable Green of Creative Commons will discuss how open policies, like those in British Columbia and California, are ensuring publicly funded resources are openly licensed. He will describe the global opportunity for governments and projects to collaborate to maximize the quality and quantity of OER.

David Harris, Editor in Chief, for OpenStax College will introduce the lessons learned from OpenStax College. OpenStax College has a rapidly growing adoption base of more than 175 institutions. David will discuss the strategies required for taking OER into the mainstream and the emerging interest in localized OER content.

Megan Beckett, Content Coordinator for Open Textbooks at Siyavula Education, will discuss their unique position as the South African government has printed the Siyavula textbooks for the whole country, thus jump starting the adoption of open textbooks in the K-12 sector. Megan will also discuss some ideas about engaging the community in the development of open textbooks which in turn feeds back into their adoption and widespread use.

David Ernst, Chief Information Officer, College of Education and Human Development, and Executive Director of the Open Academics project at the University of Minnesota, will discuss common barriers to open textbook adoption by faculty and how the Open Academics project is working to help overcome those barriers.

Nicole Allen of the Student Public Interest Research Groups will discuss how students and other members of the campus community can drive OER adoption and advocacy through grassroots efforts.

Connie Broughton of the Washington Open Course Library will discuss the project recently completed in which 81 open courses were created, including many open textbooks. She will detail their efforts to increase and track adoption during the creation of the resources and following the completion of that phase of the project.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Megan Beckett

Megan Beckett

Lead Instructional Design, Siyavula
I very much believe in exploring the intersection of maths, science, art and design and the resulting possibilities once we break down the traditional barriers between these areas, and the barriers to education. I think this is especially true in engaging and inspiring young minds and making STEM education accessible and relevant. This can be achieved through innovative technology, inspired pedagogy and embracing an open, collaborative culture... Read More →
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.
avatar for Mark  Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning and Open Education, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Kokopelli

11:15am

Deploying Our Faculty: On the Road to Academic Freedom!
This presentation will outline and describe an effective approach (model) used by Chadron State College leadership to empower faculty to collaborate, design and develop OER materials, courses and modules that will work to enhance the quality of education provided to Teacher Education Candidates, and ultimiately reduce their overall education costs. This model is easily transferrable to other disciplines and/or levels of education.

Topics to be shared include:
1. Open Education Nebraska! ? a CSC Open Education Online Resource Repository http://www.OpenEducationNebraska.com
2.CSC E-Scribe Student Initiative
3.Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative?multi-institutional Next Generation Learning Challenges Grant (NGLC) to improve student academic success via the use of Open Education Resources (OER)
4.Nebraska State College System OER Summit.
5.CSC's Open Education Learning Community
6.CSC Teacher Education Dept. Initiatives-
--develop all Elementary Education Endorsement courses to an Open Education format and textbook zero by Spring 2015.
--develop all SPED Endorsement courses to an Open Education format and textbook zero by Fall 2014
--develop the first Open Education/Textbook Zero Bachelor's of Science in Education Degree program (Elem. Education and Special Education) by Fall 2015.



Speakers
avatar for Don King

Don King

Chair, Education Dept., Chadron State College
I'm in my 20th year here at Chadron State, and currently am Chairperson of the Education/Special Education Department. I hold a BS Degree from California Polytechnic State University in Agricultural Sciences, and a Ph.D. in Agriculture Education. I have worked in | 7-12 High School Vocational Agriculture, international agriculture programs (USAID Programs), and teacher education. | | I currently teach graduate and undergraduate level... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Painted Horse

11:15am

OER and Public Policy: Overview & Opportunities
From textbook affordability to closing the achievement gap, OER offers a solution to numerous problems faced by governments at the local, state and federal level. A broad-based and growing movement for ?Open Policies? that support open-licensing of publicly funded resources seek to address these problems, and provide fair access to the resources that the public paid to create.

This session will provide a basic introduction to where OER fits into public policy, specifically geared toward conference attendees who are interested in other ?Open Policy? themed sessions. Participants will leave with an understanding of the basic types of OER policies, a roundup of specific examples both in the U.S. and around the world, and where opportunities lie for future expansion. The session will also include recommendations for advocacy strategies, and useful resources. Ample time will be left for questions and discussion with members of the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Arrowhead

11:45am

A Year in the Trenches with TOTAL-OER! An Artichoke's Story of Survival
In the Spring of 2012, the math department at SCC made the commitment to use only Open Educational Resources in their developmental mathematics courses and for college algebra. Along with that commitment came the realization that replacing the existing course materials involved much more than finding textbooks. Textbooks needed to be adopted and modified to fit the curriculum, workbooks and videos needed developed for tutorials and practice problems, online homework software needed refined and configured and instructors materials had to be created.

This kicked off what turned out to be a mad scramble and a massive amount of activity to prepare for the fall semester. The activity continued through the fall and spring as faculty made efforts to improve and enhance the materials even further. Along the way, the teams ran into obstacles, made compromises and experienced success.

Our results have been overwhelmingly positive for both students and faculty. 40+ instructors in 65 course sections utilized the OER materials and the cost savings for students in Fall 2012 were well over $180,000. Results of a student/faculty survey indicated that most felt that the materials met their needs both inside and outside the classroom as well or better than high cost textbooks.

In this session, our faculty team will:
? Describe how the project came about and why it was important.
? Share the process used to bring together existing and newly developed OER Materials to create a complete learning system.
? Share samples of the OER Materials developed, including:
o Samples of OER books and workbook materials.
o Samples of created resources including Livescribe videos, Softchalk lessons, and Screencasts.
o The configuration of the online homework system (MathAS), including the complete set of online Homework/Quiz questions.
? Discuss the challenges faced and how they were meet, including:
o Ensuring that faculty, full time and adjunct, felt included in the process and had the resources they needed.
o Printing and istribution of the materials and working with the Bookstore.
o Licensing and copyright issues
? Share the results of the project in terms of student success and student/instructor feedback.
? Share how the materials are being adopted and adapted at other colleges within the Maricopa Community College District.
? Discuss how the project is going to be maintained and enhanced as an ongoing living educational system.
? Give idea and resources for other colleges to pursue Total OER.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Gaudet

Donna Gaudet

Mathematics Faculty/Department Chair, Scottsdale Community College


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
White Pine

11:45am

Developing and deploying models that support the broad adoption and use of open educational resources
Phukusi la Moyo, a health, Integrated Management of Child Illnesses and Safe Motherhood radio program started with funding from Commonwealth of Learning (COL) in 2009 to Maimwana in Mchinji, Malawi. As one of the trainers and facilitator in radio programming we came up with a participatory radio programming model. The participatory model involved all the stakeholders on ground in radio program designing workshop. The stakeholders included: Miamwana?s facilitators; Ministry of health?s District Health Officer, and Communication and Health education officer; Mudziwathu (in My Village) Community Radio producers, and last but not least the women?s group members representing the affected and common people.
The radio program designing workshop included messages development basing on the issues nad problems outlined in baseline survey by Maimwana, choosing a program format based on complexity of issues, program naming, Programs matrix that includes communications objectives and targets of each program, participatory radio programming training nad monitoring procedures and tools. The stakeholders owned the program though the designing workshop.
Therefore this paper describes the process and results of the participatory radio programming model which was used in Malawi. The program succeeded in achieving the goal of providing the non-formal education to the communities surrounding Mchinji and within Mudziwathu Community Radio Catchment area in giving the women?s groups discussion platform for health and safe motherhood issues. Issues discussed included those which could hardly be discussed as they were taken as taboos but were form of gender oppression on women and children. Some notable results included improvement in health care as personnel were now kind and good to clients, increased awareness of health services and danger signs of illnesses, improvement in health care seeking behavior as husbands and village headmen knew their roles in maternal and child health issues and hence reduced mortality rates.

Speakers
avatar for Gladson Makowa

Gladson Makowa

Execetive Officer, Info-Exchange Agency
I am Gladson Makowa, currently pursuing Masters of Science in Rural Development and Extension at Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (LUANAR) formerly under University of Malawi. | | I have been working in development communications organizations since 1999. I have facilitated trainings of a number of community radios in Africa in countries like South Africa, Cameroon just to mention a few with the support from... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Kokopelli

11:45am

Assessment and accreditation of Learners using OER
This paper examines existing and potential scalable approaches to formal assessment and accreditation to digital learning, comparing and contrasting such uses with more traditional approaches. Unbundling of services, so that assessment & accreditation are separate from teaching and support, makes OER much easier to implement and build upon. There is little requirement for physical space, so it can grow in a similar fashion as that of many Internet platforms. This of course makes OER much more scalable than physical institutions can compete with. While international or even national accreditation & assessment services are not currently widespread or easily accessible, developing a robust system that can service thousands or even hundreds of thousands of students could change the dynamic of access to post-secondary education. All of the technology is already available, such as payment systems, content management systems, and exam taking.

Lessons learned so far from key initiatives in this area are discussed, proposing tentative guidance for policy makers and various stakeholder groups in this area.
Currently, the greatest potential and demand for OER:
is in non-OECD countries;
at non-traditional institutions;
at institutions with PLAR models in place.

Breaking down institutional silos is still a major issue before a large-scale OER/PLAR/RPL system is in place. In terms of cost-effective and sustainable approaches to student support, peer-to-peer learning support models were considered to be the most effective, followed by support from retired academics or other volunteers, and the design of system to enable senior students or graduates to provide support for junior students.
As for the types of assessment methods that would most likely be used in the future recognition of prior learning via portfolio assessment and course-based portfolios were both considered appropriate, as well as automated online assessments.

The greatest barriers to participation in open assessment and accreditation practices identified were the lack of availability of committed staff members to support such activities, and the potential costs of redeveloping courses as open educational resources. Lack of support for OER-based courses from senior management was a significantly greater concern for participants from traditional education institutions than for those from institutions with open policies, and was perceived to be a more significant barrier within public than private institutions. These findings suggest that institutions that already have policies that support open assessment and accreditation practices will be able to easily align the implementation of collaborative OER courses with existing policies and processes.

The key institutional success factors for the provision of open assessment and accreditation services appear to be a strong support base within institutions ? both in terms of leadership and resources, and an existing culture of openness, including policies and practices around the creation and use of OERs, as well as policies that enable either open access or recognition of prior learning via credit transfer or PLAR. Institutions that are already characterized by these features are likely to be best placed for the implementation of assessment and accreditation of OER-based learning, and could provide models for other organizations

Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Painted Horse

11:45am

OER: Institutional and Legislative Considerations to Enhance Academic Freedom
Institutions, faculty, legislatures, and OER producers are increasingly concerned with the growing affordability gap in education. As OER matures, the quality of the materials is improving, new services are being offered, and efficacy research is underway. The move of OER into the mainstream will be driven primarily by faculty. Outside advocates and producers of OER need to create opportunities that enhance academic freedom to drive usage. Our panel is made up of an OER publisher, an OER author, and an OER adopter/advocate. David Harris, Editor in Chief for Connexions will briefly review the rapid growth in adoptions of OpenStax College project David will also introduce three "warning" signs-mandates, work flow, and patience- that threaten to slow down the impact of OER. Dr. Barbara Illowsky, professor of statistics and co-author of Collaborative statistics, will provide an overview of OER developments in California and she will present paths to adoption that enhance academic freedom. Dr. Illowsky will also share her insights of OER deployment at De Anza College in Cupertino, California. Heather Wylie, instructor of sociology at Shasta College in California, will share the efforts being made at Shasta College to drive OER usage. Heather will also provide metrics and insights into student performance after the deployment of open text book in her sociology course. Senator Dean Florez, President of the 20MM Foundation, will provide insights into the legislative landscape and OER. Senator Florez will also discuss an approach that could be taken to incentive the use of OER and enhance academic freedom. The panel will close with a Q&A session.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Illowsky

Barbara Illowsky

California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Arrowhead

1:15pm

Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation: Creating a path towards an affordable, accredited higher education together
Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation: Creating a path towards an affordable, accredited higher education together
At last year?s Open Ed Conference, both Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation presented on how they would utilize OER to offer a path towards an affordable higher education and touched on the partnership that was forming between the two. One year has passed and the partnership is in full swing. We have 5 Saylor courses matched with 5 of Excelsior?s UExcel examinations that learners can take to earn credit on a regionally accredited college transcript. The courses are free and the exams cost the learner $95 ? indeed an affordable path towards achieving actual college credit.
In this presentation, we will talk about how the partnership was created, explore the process of matching courses to credit-bearing exams, and dive into the data collected on student participation, completion, and success on exam taking. We will show how separating learning from credit can create an affordable path to credit that can work with multiple sources of OER and can be scaled to large numbers of learners.

Speakers
DR

Devon Ritter

Special Projects Associate, The Saylor Foundation


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
White Pine

1:15pm

A Model for Delivering Open Educational Resources to K12 Teachers: Integration and Use in Planning and Practice
Educational digital libraries have provided access to open educational resources for over 10 years. Although the libraries have enjoyed a high volume of visits and use of the resources, K12 teachers had not adopted and integrated the resources into their regular planning and teaching practices. In 2009, the Curriculum Customization Service (CCS) was developed to deliver online educational resources from educational digital libraries to K12 teachers as an integrated and aligned piece to their curriculum.

The CCS (ccs.dls.ucar.edu) is an online instructional planning tool designed by teachers, for teachers, with a joint research and development team from the University of Colorado Boulder and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The CCS is designed to assist teachers in planning and implementing differentiated instruction for diverse student populations. Through an ongoing participatory design process, classroom teachers provide feedback on the system and propose new development ideas based on their current needs. The CCS provides educators with access to materials aligned to standards and the curriculum, including vetted STEM open educational resources (i.e. animations, videos, images, inquiry data) from the Digital Library for Earth System Education and the National Science Digital Library, teacher-contributed shared materials (i.e. PowerPoints, images, homework assignments, playlists), and even some publisher materials. Teachers can learn more about the practices of their peers through resource ratings, an activity feed, and shared materials. Currently the CCS is used by middle and high school Earth and physical science teachers in six school districts in Colorado, Nevada, and Utah. Over the next year the tool is being expanded to include high school Algebra and Biology.

The research and development team have collected varying data about the teacher users since the inception of the tool. This includes clickstream data for all teacher users and for a subset online surveys, phone interviews, classroom observations, and student assessments. Teachers usually participate in a face-to-face or online professional development before using the CCS, where they are introduced to it, the digital libraries providing the open educational resources, and the ?shared stuff? area where they are encouraged to share their own materials with their colleagues. Data from research indicates that teachers value and enjoy using the CCS to find and use relevant open educational resources, use resources shared by other teachers, and even use publisher materials.

This presentation will provide an overview of the CCS, the participatory design process, the integration of OER into teacher?s regular planning and teaching, an overview of research results, and future directions.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Leary

Heather Leary

Research Associate, University of Colorado Boulder
I am an educational researcher passionate about inquiry-based learning, open education, teacher professional learning, and technology integration (where it makes the most sense) all for increasing student knowledge and skills.


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Kokopelli

1:15pm

Opening Up Assessment: Open Tools and Item Banks
One of the defining characteristics of Open Education has been the widespread sharing of course materials from OpenCourseWare to Open Textbooks to more generally open educational resources (OERs). Unfortunately many OERs are primarily content or course materials and do not include sufficient quizzes or other activities that students can use to check for understanding and that instructors can use to track engagement and performance. Research shows that embedding assessments in texts increases student completion rates and learning. Open Assessment complements existing OER efforts with tools to allow instructors to embed assessments in any OER, and to create shared collections of assessment items.

MIT and Open Tapestry are developing tools and services to allow instructors and authors to embed assessments directly in any content (e.g., in any OpenCourseWare course) thereby providing a richer learning experience. And BYU will be developing validated item banks of open assessments that can be shared (which will be developed by domain experts and psychometricians). Our approach differs from current practice because existing tools require one of two things: either a system that presents both content and assessments together as part of a dedicated system or the the learner is required to leave the content to take an assessment in a separate quiz system breaking the flow of learning. To be able to embed an assessment of your choosing in any existing OER wherever it might be presented will be truly powerful.

This panel presentation will provide conference participants the opportunity to understand how to use the tools, existing and forthcoming open assessment item banks, and how to use open assessment in their OER content regardless of where it's located right away.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Ball

Justin Ball

CTO, Atomic Jolt
I measure my chocolate consumption in pounds.
avatar for Joel Duffin

Joel Duffin

CEO, Atomic Jolt
I'm the CEO of Open Tapestry, a startup focused on helping organizations leverage open education content. Open Tapestry is a platform for online learning that helps you discover, assemble, deploy, and track online learning resources.
avatar for Brandon Muramatsu

Brandon Muramatsu

Assistant Director, Strategic Education Initiative, MIT
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Painted Horse

1:15pm

Policy and Parties: State OER Policy Recommendations and a Guide for Collaborative Content Development
This session will discuss two new reports from the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), which were released over the summer. The first report - Open Educational Resources and Collaborative Content Development: A Practical Guide for State and School Leaders - provides educational leaders with a guide describing the benefits of OER, a framework for planning, and strategies for successful collaborative content development across political and building boundaries.
The second report - OER State Policy in K-12 Education: Benefits, Strategies, and Recommendations for Open Access, Open Sharing and - helps policymakers promote collaboration and deeper learning with open educational resources (OER). The report demonstrates how policymakers are helping teachers to build resources, share educational materials and personalize instruction by permitting publicly funded learning materials to be shared openly as OER. Among the report's collected policy recommendations, three key principles are apparent for effective sharing of learning materials:
  • Emphasize that materials created by state, regional, or local entities using public funds will hold an open license for sharing, collaboration, and access for all educators and students.

  • Allow states with instructional materials lists to include vetted OER.

  • Allow instructional materials and other funding to support development, maintenance, and infrastructure for OER and technology infrastructure with flexible uses of funding.

To download a copy of Open Educational Resources and Collaborative Content Development: A Practical Guide for State and School Leaders please visit http://bit.ly/inacoloerguide

To download a copy of OER State Policy in K-12 Education: Benefits, Strategies, and Recommendations for Open Access, Open Sharing, please visit http://bit.ly/inacoloerpolicyguide.

Speakers
avatar for TJ Bliss

TJ Bliss

Program Officer, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Working to understand the costs, outcomes, use, and perceptions of OER. Passionate about my family, my religion, and my job.
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Arrowhead

1:45pm

Community College Consortium Save Students Millions and Expands Access to High-Quality Education
The Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources is a community of over 200 colleges promoting the adoption of OER to enhance teaching and learning and expand access to high-quality education. Through monthly professional development webinars and in-person workshops for faculty and staff, consortium members share best practices to find and adopt high-quality open educational resources to reduce costs to students and improve student success. In addition to measuring the savings, member colleges are surveying students and faculty to determine learning outcomes in courses and departments where OER has replaced the traditional instructional materials.

Hear from OER leaders at Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Hartnell College, Houston Community College, Scottsdale College, and Tacoma College who have developed OER faculty adopter communities on their campuses to increase student success through lower costs and expanded access.

Bluegrass Community and Technical College in Kentucky has saved students over $100, 000 in textbooks costs over the last two years through adoption of open educational resources. Primary savings have been in the Geography department but other disciplines are also active. In addition to creating web pages to help faculty find OER more easily, an OER Steering Committee is being formed to further OER adoption throughout the college.

Hartnell College in California has multiple disciplines including Criminal Justice that utilize open and affordable educational resources. The college has recently developed tools to measure student retention and outcomes by course and semester. They will share information on how the use of OER impacts student success.

The math department at Scottsdale College in Arizona started adopting OER in 2010 and within three years converted its entire math curriculum through pre-calculus to use open educational resources. This has resulted in savings to students of over $250,000 per year. Survey feedback has indicated a majority of students believe the OER-based materials are as good or better than traditional textbooks they have used.

Tacoma Community College in Washington started the two-year ?Liberate $250,000? OER Student Savings project in fall of 2012 and has already exceeded that savings in the first year. The goal of the project is to create a clearinghouse of materials that instructors can choose from so they don?t have to be dependent on the textbook for each course. Some instructors may still choose to use textbooks; it will depend on the requirements of the each course and instructor.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Outreach, Open Courseware Consortium
I am passionate about expanding access to education through the adoption of open textbooks and open educational resources. As the Community College Outreach Director at the Open Courseware Consortium, I work with faculty and staff at community colleges to create awareness and share best practices for finding, creating, and remixing open educational resources to improve teaching and learning for all learners.
avatar for Donna Gaudet

Donna Gaudet

Mathematics Faculty/Department Chair, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Tacoma Community College
Librarian, Administrator | I am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From the College Open Textbooks Community)


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
White Pine

1:45pm

A Red Hat for OER: Lumen's Journey Towards a Sustainable Model Supporting OER Adoption and Improvement

After a decade and $100M US in foundation funding, an incredible amount of high quality open educational resources exist which are only rarely used in formal settings. The situation feels very much like it did with open source software a decade ago. At the turn of the century, almost everyone had heard of open source and was interested in potentially saving money and improving the stability and quality of their technology offerings, but very few institutions had either the bravery or the capacity to run systems for which there was no formal training and no technical support. Red Hat stepped into this vast pool of curiosity and caution with training, technical support, and other services that put adopting Linux within the reach of a normal institution.

Lumen is trying to do exactly same thing – step into the deep pool of curiosity and caution around open educational resources with the faculty training, academic leadership consulting, technical and pedagogical support, learning analytics services, and other pieces necessary to put adopting OER within reach of a normal institution. In the past year we've worked with dozens of secondary and post-secondary institutions and learned many - sometimes painful - lessons.

In this presentation we'll review our first year of lessons learned, including what works, what not to do, and how our business model has evolved over our first year.


Speakers
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Arrowhead

1:45pm

Adoption of Common Core-Aligned OER: The Role of Shared Quality Rubrics
With the launch of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), curriculum decision makers and teachers are facing new challenges related to identifying, adapting and creating learning materials that are high quality and aligned to the new K- 12 standards. Several states have come to the forefront in addressing these resource needs by working to develop Common Core-aligned, openly available resources, including New York, North Carolina, Illinois, Hawaii, and others. Educators and national experts in these states are developing free, online CCSS-aligned teaching strategies embedded in units of study, and are working toward common methods for defining and sharing exemplary CCSS content. [

This session will highlight how several states are developing new OER policies and technical integration approaches that may impact OER adoption based on enabling the sharing of quality content, metadata, and analytics. Using the Achieve OER and the EQuiP Quality Rubric tools embedded within OER Commons as examples, the session will further highlight evaluation workflow processes that are underway in some states to support their efforts to review, select and organize Common Core-aligned exemplars for immediate use. In addition, the session will discuss how OER evaluation and usage data that emerge out of these evaluation workflow processes can be used to continue to inform OER adoption and use within and across states.

Speakers
avatar for Amee Evans Godwin

Amee Evans Godwin

Director, Strategic Initiatives, ISKME


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Kokopelli

1:45pm

Personalized Learning - Worthy of the Hype?
In spite of the significant progress in technology for learning, today?s education systems remain largely ?one-size-fits-all?, ignoring the individuality of students and forcing them into artificial timelines for learning that often result in learners either becoming bored or falling behind. As a result, there has been considerable recent interest in personalized learning systems (PLS) such as instructional modules that enable students to learn at their own pace and interactive computer programs designed to respond to the learner?s questions.

While successful, PLSs have been extremely difficult to realize without major investments of time, money, and expertise. Moreover, recent studies indicate that they do not always facilitate improved learning. In this presentation, we will discuss how openness enables new ways and means to advance personalize learning. In particular, we will discuss how OpenStax Tutor, a collaboration between engineers and cognitive scientists at Rice University and Duke University, improves learning by fusing cognitive science learning strategies and modern machine learning algorithms; the result is an automated, personalized, and optimized learning experience for today?s courses and students.

OpenStax Tutor marshals many different open educational resource (OER) sources in its quest to improve student learning, but two repositories stand out: Connexions (cnx.org) for rich e-texts and Quadbase (quadbase.org) for assessments. Connexions is one of the world?s first and largest OER projects. Connexions? repository of free, open-source educational content is accessible to students, instructors, and authors worldwide. Quadbase is an open access question bank, focused on serving instructors and educational platforms with support for multiple question types and embedding options. Both platforms thrive on community-submitted and -curated content, and access remains free to all under a Creative Commons attribution license.


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Painted Horse

2:30pm

The Impact of OER Textbook Adoption on Student Learning in Eight Post-Secondary Courses.
An increasing number of faculty are embracing OER as a replacement for traditional textbooks in post-secondary schools. The National OER Impact Study collects student outcome data for courses using OER and compares it to data from matched control groups of students using traditional textbooks in order to examine whether OER adoption measurably affects student learning. Data from this study comes from schools using Open Course Library (OCL) of the Washington State Board of Community and Technical College (WSBCTC), schools involved in the Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative, and some teachers who have adopted textbooks from OpenStax.

We also provide updates on our research considering student and faculty perceptions of OER curricular materials.

We present results and challenges from the data collected in the 2012-2013 school year. This data includes cost comparison data for courses and updated information about the total amount of student savings produced by these OER initiatives.

We discuss future directions for OER research suggested by this study, as well as the implications that this research has for the OER community in general.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
White Pine

2:30pm

How to Make It Work for Faculty: A study of how Washington community and technical college faculty use Open Educational Resources
While new open educational resources are being continuously created, little data exists on how faculty in higher education actually use and perceive open educational resources, and more importantly what types of support faculty need to help them implement the open educational resources. After developing the Open Course Library, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) conducted a study of how faculty at the 34 system colleges use OER. The purpose of the study is to investigate 1) how and to what extent open educational resources are being used in the college classroom, 2) how faculty perceive open educational resources, 3) what type of support is needed to help faculty embrace the open educational resources.
In this study, a mixed-method design was used incorporating both quantitative and qualitative study methodologies. We began our study by developing an extensive survey in collaboration with two faculty unions of the community and technical colleges in the state of Washington. The survey was sent to all faculty in the system. Based on the survey results, we conducted a qualitative Delphi study. Delphi is a collective human intelligence process among experts, in this case, a focus group consisting of open educational resources experts in Washington CTC system. The group discussed what constitutes the best support system for faculty?s use of open educational resources.
Based on the data collected from survey, and the consensus from the qualitative Delphi study, we created a conceptual framework that informs faculty?s needs, use, expectations, and most importantly the types of support in using open educational resources.
This study will provide a roadmap for anyone who organizes the future professional development plan for open educational movement in higher education. It will remind the audiences of the most crucial aspect of building and promoting open educational resources: how to make it work for faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Boyoung Chae

Boyoung Chae

Policy Associate, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
avatar for Mark  Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning and Open Education, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Kokopelli

2:30pm

VOCAT 3.0
In 2007, the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute at Baruch College, CUNY, launched VOCAT, the Video Oral Communication Assessment Tool), an open-source, web-based teaching tool and assessment instrument that allows instructors to give students written and oral feedback on uploaded videos. Since 2007, the Schwartz Institute has supported VOCAT in over 900 sections from courses across more than a dozen disciplines. More than 15,000 students and 200 instructors have used the system. We?ve used it for prior learning assessment, advisement, reviewing rehearsals, debate prep, and several other purposes.

This fall, along with Cast Iron Coding, a Portland, Oregon web development firm, we will be rolling out a rebuilt tool. This version features server-side processing, real-time video annotation, mobile application support, and a customizable rubrics library. It can handle multiple media types and export summative assessment data from across the application. This latest version of the software can be shared widely across institutions since it can be simply installed and demands fewer hardware and system administration resources. With its new feature set, VOCAT can be used by educators to explore a wide range of pedagogies and curricula.

We are excited to share the tool at OpenEd, and to think collectively about how it might be used and further developed.

Speakers
avatar for Lucas Waltzer

Lucas Waltzer

Baruch College


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Painted Horse

2:30pm

I Have Credit for My OER Learning--Who Will Accept It?
Discussions of pathways to credit for OER-based learning often focus on methods of assessment, and this is important. One dimension of suitability of assessment is scalability: if thousands are learning using a given set of OER, institution- or department-level portfolios or challenge exams may not always be available. Large-scale assessments are more cost-effective and can reach more learners. However, many institutions are wary of accepting credit assessed by anyone outside their institutions, so many learners find, after taking a large-scale exam, that their chosen college or university will not accept the credit. This presentation is a call to encourage transparent credit transfer policies that embrace multiple types of assessment of learning. The presentation will include examples of transfer credit policies and recommendations for participants for how to encourage a culture of acceptance of learning outside the academy.

Speakers

Thursday November 7, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Arrowhead

3:00pm

The Impact of OER Science Textbook Adoption on Student Learning in Secondary Schools.
In 2011-2012, 18 teachers in earth systems, biology, and chemistry adopted OER textbooks to replace traditional publisher-produced textbooks. 43% of all students enrolled in these courses used the OER texts.

Our study examines the impact of OER textbook adoption on student science learning. We collected student data on 2012 and 2011 state science criterion referenced test (CRT) scores, student GPA data, and student demographic data for 4,183 students, as well as teacher effectiveness data. Using the statistical technique propensity score matching, we created matched groups. We then analyzed these groups using multiple regression and found that controlling for variables like student ability, student demographics, and teacher, students using OER textbooks scored significantly higher on the state CRTs.

We discuss possible explanations for this observed difference as well as limitations of the study. We also discuss what implications this study has for future directions of OER research.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
White Pine

3:00pm

Open Translational Scholars
Michigan State University is developing a new role for students in research projects across disciplines that drives the use, and adoption of, OER methodology. Called a ?Translational Scholar,? this role prepares students to be agents of change in their field. As part of a research team, graduate students not only conduct research but also serve in a translational role, creating open knowledge for stakeholders of the research.

Students create three outputs as part of their role on a research project or research internship: (1) publishable research such as a thesis or contribution to a paper; (2) a teaching case or example, including open data, in print or video designed for use in a specific curriculum; (3) training or information materials for the community or setting in which they are doing their research. The teaching case and the community materials are designed to be peer reviewed and published as Open Educational Resources.

Several initiatives at MSU have incorporated Translational Scholars into their projects. The AgShare project, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is working with the RUFORUM (Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture) to scale up the AgShare Method of Translational Scholars by embedding the model in their participatory action research teams. The USAID-funded Global Center for Food Systems Innovation has built Translational Scholars into their research teams; and the National Institutes for Health-funded conference grant for One-Health created a Translational Scholar Corp to work with faculty teams.

Project leads are currently developing a shared set of Translational Scholar competencies across these projects. An Open Knowledge Convening in February 2013 resulted in an initial set of skills, knowledge and behavior required of students in this new role on a research team. We invite participants to collaborate in the creation of a Translational Scholar Corps across organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Geith

Christine Geith

CEO, eXtension Foundation
How we can help you make a more visible and more measureable local impact!


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Kokopelli

3:00pm

Breaking through to Open Learning Potential by Unbundling Learning Achievements
What happens if/when courses are no longer the coin of the realm, and increasingly learners acquire skills and demonstrable knowledge through individual learning activities from multiple providers that have been unbundled/disaggregated from traditional educational frameworks? Clay Shirky has argued that MOOCs are the MP3 of higher education, threatening to disrupt current business models when consumers expect easier, cheaper access to individual components of education, rather than being forced to buy the whole ?album? from a traditional provider (?Higher Education: Our MP3 is the MOOC?). Whether or not you agree with Shirky, we are already seeing unprecedented shifts in higher ed that support this unbundling.
Innovative institutions are beginning to respond to this demand through a variety of approaches:
? Credit for completing MOOCs.
? More robust and flexible ways of providing prior learning credits.
? Competency-based learning outside and across traditional courses.
Can we position the phenomena driving changes in education to unleash even more progressive open learning opportunities?
? Traditional degrees and certificates that are composed of traditional credits, but the credits are compiled from courses plus a variety of other sources, such as prior learning credits, community service, and badge frameworks.
? Alternative credentials that substitute for traditional degrees or certificates, composed of demonstrated/validated competencies tailored to the desired outputs. Examples are emerging in vocational areas, such as specific manufacturing skill sets, where the source of the learning is insignificant in comparison to the verified ability to perform a job. The evolution of partnerships between educational institutions and employers, unions, and industry associations is changing this arena to provide more effective academic to workplace transitions.
? Fluid, lifelong engagement in learning communities that provide reputation frameworks for peer validation, with badging and other designations of achievements. As these communities evolve, they integrate with ecosystems for employment, civic engagement, and other contexts outside traditional educational institutions.
The capabilities to realize these possibilities already exist. Emerging technologies make it increasingly easy to track and aggregate learning activities, as well as provide assessment and human/social validation. Data visualizations from learning analytics make it easy to find and develop learning connections (human and intellectual), formulate alternative learning paths and track progress, gather evidence of learning, and combine achievements for a variety of purposes. Badge frameworks are being integrated into many different types of learning environments.
None of us will pretend that there are not significant barriers to these opportunities, including ponderous institutional infrastructures and attitudes, inflexible policy and regulatory frameworks, and centuries of ingrained expectations about what it means to be educated. But we should expect that learners will increasingly demand flexible learning achievement environments, and by providing them, we can contribute to changes that fire learning enthusiasm, improve learner success, and ultimately increase human potential.
This presentation will provide concrete analysis of recent examples that are breaking barriers and unbundling learning achievements. The speakers will demonstrate the immediate and emerging impact of changes in government policy, civic/educational partnerships in badge frameworks, and breakthrough implementations of competency-based learning in the workforce.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Everhart

Deborah Everhart

Director of Integration Strategy, Blackboard
Opening up new opportunities through open badges, social learning, and personalized, flexible, competency-based learning.


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Painted Horse

3:00pm

Online courses and social responsibility toward learners
When we develop and validate traditional degree programmes great emphasis is placed on ensuring that applicants meet entry criteria for enrolment, and that students gain a quality experience to reach their academic and employment potential. If a student drops out, course leaders will be concerned for their welfare, and the institution will try and understand why an individual has left. Indeed, with the advent of escalating higher education fees in the UK in 2013, strategies for ?retention? and ?completion? are all important, not just in terms of economics (minimising lost income if a student leaves and minimising the student?s debt), but in terms of social responsibility to ensure students from all backgrounds are successful (1).

It is interesting therefore that the same ethical stance is not placed at the doors of online courses.

The internet has given the public a tremendous means of accessing courses whether for fun or to gain credentials. Massive-scale courses such as those offered by ?The Challenge? lead thousands of learners though the skills of online marketing and the use of social media. Instructional videos are blended with vibrant forums led by expert mentors (2). A similar model in more recent years has been applied to education with the advent of the MOOC (massive online open course), and access to truly open courses and open educational resources are being encouraged by governments (3).

Despite this activity, little is published about who takes online courses and why? Clearly a huge body of user data becomes available via the large-scale education platforms, but this doesn?t provide a rich insight into user attitudes and behaviours. Some research explains why students drop out of online courses, stating information overload and difficulties keeping pace with assessments (4), but little is known of the experiences of the general public who now have access to all this learning. As an educator I am concerned that if people gain a negative experience, it may reduce their desire to participate in education in any form in the future.

The aim of this research is to take a broader stance. Who takes online courses in general and why? What are the personal attributes that drive completion? What do parents think about the prospect of online courses becoming part of their child?s education? Methods will include questionnaires distributed online, and face-to-face interviews with volunteers. The target demographic will be those who have participated in online courses and those who haven?t. The outcomes of this work will build a picture about online course users, and discuss the social and ethical stances that should be displayed to those wishing to learn ?any time, any place, any where?.

(1) Thomas L (2012). What works? Student retention and success. Available: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/retention/What_works_final_report.pdf
(2) The Challenge (2013). Available: http://www.challenge.co
(3) European Commission (2012). Consultation on "Opening up Education". Available: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/education_culture/consult/open_en.htm
(4) Willging PA and Johnson SD (2009). Factors that influence students? decision to dropout of online courses. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, Volume 13: Issue 3

Speakers

Thursday November 7, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Arrowhead

3:30pm

What We Know about OER and its Effect on Students: A Literature Review
This systematic review of literature aims to answer three guiding questions: (1) What evidence exists that the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) textbooks in secondary and higher education leads to comparable student educational outcomes as traditional curricular materials? (2) How does literature pertaining to evaluating OER compare to the literature evaluating textbook quality and adoption in general? and (3) What does a systematic review of these two literature domains suggest about future directions for OER research? The reviewer concludes that the OER community should use systematic and rigorous studies of empirical impacts of open textbook adoption to add rigor and respectability to the community?s body of research. Research from the literature on general textbooks provides insight as to what future OER research might look like.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
White Pine

3:30pm

Engaging Students & Other Campus Constituencies as OER Advocates
College students are a powerful but often overlooked ally in the open education movement. As the primary beneficiaries of OER, students are uniquely positioned to be effective advocates to instructors, colleges and policy makers. However, students often understand openness differently than members of the community do, and may value it for different reasons.

In this session, the directors of two student efforts for open education and open access will share exclusive insight into the student perspective on openness, examples of what students from across the globe are doing to have an impact, and to begin engaging students in open education efforts.

The session will also include advice for engaging librarians and faculty members in OER advocacy, and tips for using the principles of grassroots organizing to build a movement on campus.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC
Nick Shockey is the Director of Programs & Engagement for SPARC and founding Director of the Right to Research Coalition, an international alliance of student organizations that promote Open Access to the results of research through advocacy and education. As the Director of Programs & Engagement, Nick is responsible for growing SPARC’s engagement with members and the wider community, managing SPARC’s digital platforms, and... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Kokopelli

3:30pm

A More Open Minnesota - Open Governance, Open Policies, and Affordable Education
This presentation highlights how by promoting openness in diverse ways from OER, to OA, to MOOCs, to OSS, to Open Governance and Open Innovation, students in universities through their student government organizations can more effectively address their concerns and help improve the functioning of the university. By promoting open policies and greater collaboration we are able to harness students? cognitive surplus and find the common ground needed to address paradoxes.

It is with the collective effort of students, staff members, and administrators that we can help transform education. Without activism however, openness may take longer in reaching a tipping point and fail to maximize the benefits it can bring to society. The Graduate and Professional Student Assembly (GAPSA) at the University of Minnesota has emphasized the need for a more Open Minnesota by supporting and advocating for OA, OER and Open Textbooks at the university senate and at the state legislation. Together with other student organizations, GAPSA has also encouraged the use of the open textbook catalog (open.umn.edu) and increased awareness for openness statewide. GAPSA also partnered with the libraries and hosted events during both open education week and open access week, and it hopes to implement more pro-openness policies the upcoming academic year.

Openness is more than the reduction of costs, or the 4Rs (Revise, Remix, Redistribute and Reuse) as openness as a philosophy also encourages cultural changes. As illustrated by Beth Novek and the Obama Administration, and Gavin Newsom in his book Citizenville greater openness can help us to more effectively meet the challenges of the 21st century. In this presentation, we hope to share various ways in which openness can be promoted at a university-level by student groups as well as learn from attendees? feedback.

This year, GAPSA has promoted open governance in multiple ways, from hosting a policy sprint for the drafting a new constitution and bylaws, to developing partnerships with pro-openness organizations such as TEDx and promoting the use of social media to better engage and gauge student concerns, as well as partnering with like-minded student organizations. GAPSA has also worked to provide students with opportunities to increasingly share, discuss, explain their ideas to a wider audience by harnessing the potential of open technologies and crowd-accelerated innovation. GAPSA is also in the process of developing workshops where students can learn how to present their ideas concisely via a video presentations. We believe it is important for students to have the opportunity to share their ideas through the use of emerging technologies and in innovative ways.

This past year, GAPSA also focused in applying civic engagement techniques to address complex challenges. Through its partnership with the Center for Integrative Leadership (CIL) it hosted Finding Common Ground forums, World Cafe, and Open Space Technology (OST) events along with other open governance and integrative leadership events to promote integrative and cooperative decision-making. GAPSA held an OST conversation on E-learning with the Provost and a World Cafe conversation with UMN?s President. GAPSA has also been involved in the evaluation of MOOCs and set aside funds for teaching students how to create MOOCs, as well as encouraging the development of problem-solving MOOCs to develop innovative solutions to problems and harness the potential of crowd-accelerated innovation.

Speakers
avatar for Alfonso Sintjago

Alfonso Sintjago

IT Fellow - PhD Student, University of Minnesota
My interests include global education, open education, openness, information communication technologies, mobile learning, Latin America and service learning.


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Arrowhead

3:30pm

Incorporating OER in a DOL Competency Model 21st Century eLearning Course
In 2010, the DOL published the Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) clearly outlining the skills required by industry workers. In 2011, the DOL funded the $20M National Information Security & Geospatial Technology Consortium (NISGTC), including Salt Lake Community College. The NISGTC has completed a complete sequence of GTCM-aligned eLearning courses which directly incorporate these competencies. The innovative courses are built around the Universal Design for Learning principles as well as incorporating live-in-the-application labs using the latest in virtualized remote access server technology for anywhere learning.

Speakers
PD

Phillip Davis

Director, GeoTech Center
EdD, Director, Geo Tech Center


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Painted Horse

6:30pm

Dinner and Music
Join us for a Rocky Mountain Barbecue dinner, and stick around for a performance by the Crescent Super Band, the top ranked high school jazz band in the United States.

Thursday November 7, 2013 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Kokopelli
 
Friday, November 8
 

9:00am

KEYNOTE: Christine Geith
Christine Geith is assistant provost and executive director of Michigan State University MSUglobal Knowledge and Learning Innovations. She leads the development of new entrepreneurial approaches in higher education using technology, online learning and open models. Recently, she’s worked with faculty to open up critical knowledge to help transform global food systems and agriculture.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Geith

Christine Geith

CEO, eXtension Foundation
How we can help you make a more visible and more measureable local impact!


Friday November 8, 2013 9:00am - 9:40am
Kokopelli

9:45am

KEYNOTE PANEL: Saving Students a Billion Dollars
As we've seen throughout the first ten Open Education conferences, "displacing adoptions" - formal classroom adoptions where open educational resources and open textbooks replace commercial textbooks - can save students significant money and improve learning outcomes. In this lightning panel session, representatives of major OER initiatives will report on the number of students they have impacted with displacing adoptions and the amount of money those students have saved.

Moderators
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd

Friday November 8, 2013 9:45am - 10:30am
Kokopelli

10:45am

How OER Scales the Teacher-Student Relationship, Not the Classroom
Education started with a single educator teaching a single student. This model has evolved over time, with educators teaching larger and larger groups of students. Now, technology, such as MOOCs, is pushing an even more imbalanced model, with one teacher working with 20,000 or more students. But what if technology, powered by open educational resources (OER), could scale the one-to-one teaching experience - not the classroom size? While the rise of MOOCs allow for mass attendance in courses, scaling up class sizes does not scale up the valuable, personalized teacher-student relationship. However, additional innovations in technology can address the issue of oversized classes.

The wealth of OER online provides a solution - with technology, we can make personalized teacher-student relationships possible in a large classroom setting. The accessibility of OER in the classroom is a huge potential game changer in how educators, institutions and students see technology and open education. The volume of OER content has reached critical mass and OER now is uniquely positioned to scale the teacher-student relationship. Unlike closed content, open resources can be experimented with by many educators, students, and learning systems without risk of copyright issues. The volume of experimentation with open content will dwarf the adaptive learning tests done by traditional, closed content publishers. With more smart people trying many different ideas, it will be OER that is the backbone of the adaptive, scaled teacher technologies.

Building open, personalized instruction channels opens the floodgates for students to get real-time responses to their individual needs, as they would in a historical one-on-one teacher-student relationship. Technology enables a scaled teacher relationship with personalized content that is structured and modularized, asynchronous student-paced learning, and competency-based education not driven by seat time.

To fuel this teacher-student relationship, educators have a wealth of open educational resources to pull from. These resources are open to remixing and repurposing in education, are customizable to students with different learning styles, and there?s no shortage of information to go around. Learning products that organize OER into modular content that can be customized for students? needs and enhance a personalized teacher-student relationship.

Speakers

Friday November 8, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
White Pine

10:45am

OER-Based General Education Certificate
The need to increase access to and reduce the costs of attending college is a burden shared by all higher education institutions. One way that Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) is addressing these needs is through an innovative project to promote the use of Open Educational Resources across the curriculum in a series of general education courses available online to all NOVA students.

The OER-Based General Education Certificate project is designed to allow any student at NOVA to take one or more courses that utilize free and/or open course materials and content to deliver a high quality learning experience without requiring the purchase of textbooks or other course material. The courses can be taken individually, or the series can be completed as a certificate that satisfies the first year requirements for the Associate?s degree in General Studies. The courses included in this program cover requirements for English, Math, Science, Fine Art/Humanities, Social Sciences and Student Development. By involving faculty from many academic departments at the college, we will increase awareness of OER throughout the college.

This program seeks to affect a broad population of students by creating course options in a variety of subjects that will save students money and ensure that all students in these courses have equal access to the course materials required to be successful. This program also seeks to highlight the availability of numerous high quality OER to faculty in many disciplines, and encourage more faculty to adopt OER in more courses across the college. The faculty members developing the OER versions of the courses for this project have access to a Distance Learning Librarian, Instructional Designers, and grant funds to assist in the course development process. This team approach is designed to ensure that these courses satisfy all learning objectives and deliver an effective and engaging learning environment for students.

The OER-Based General Education Certificate is available beginning fall 2013. Students in the OER-based versions of the courses offered will save an average of $185 per course, or over $1,800 for the OER-based certificate as compared to the standard course offering. We will promote the availability of these courses to the NOVA community and collect data on student success and persistence. We expect student demand for the OER courses to be robust, and that the number and variety of courses using OER will expand over time based on the success of these courses.

Speakers
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Kokopelli

10:45am

Collaborative Lesson Planning Offline; via GitHub and via Google Drive

Collaborative Lesson Planning (CLP) is a methodology and philosophy for teachers looking to capitalize on the work of other teachers and to improve those works by sharing their own remixes. This and is an update of the one I gave at OpenEd '11. Over the past two years I have found wonderful OER online made by others as well as developed many more Open Educational Resources that I have shared with teachers online and refined the methods for doing so. Building off the work of Dr. Karl Stolley I now primarily use GitHub to develop and share the OER I use in my English as a Second Language classes. Currently I use a mix of OER and proprietary resources provided by the school, but over time I seek to move to exclusive use of OER to reduce costs on my students, plus enhance the credibility and quality of resources for other instructors.

Subtly incorporating patterns uncovered by the Peeragogy Handbook (http://peeragogy.org), which I am a proud contributor to, at the College of Chicago I am collaborating with other teachers on lesson plans offline as well as via Google Drive. I will share best practices for other individuals and institutions looking to more formally adopt CLP. CLP can also be extended to student work, which I have begun by requiring students to blog a lot of their assignments (a la DS106 to a degree) and eventually I plan on educating them on Copyright so others can utilize their work more fully. For now it is enough that they complete the assignments!

Towards the same end I have started and offered two sequences of a MOOC for English as a Second or Foreign Language students online that almost only uses OER for materials. All of the course materials are available following the stream of the online lecture for students enrolled to use as well as for anyone online looking to self-study English. I am also planning on using these materials to ?flip? the classroom and will report back on that experience.

Speakers

Friday November 8, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Arrowhead

10:45am

Openness in Three Acts: A Narrative Inquiry into Teacher Educators' Conceptions of MOOC
The data for this case study was gathered during 2012, hand in hand with the growing media hype about MOOCs in higher education. Rooted in the Connectivist origins, MOOCs are seen by the author as representing an approach to learning that should be of interest to educators preparing their learners - the teachers of tomorrow - for life and work in a knowledge society. Connectivism is an approach to learning and teaching requiring radical changes in thinking on the part of all stakeholders at the educational institution in which a Connectivist MOOC is to take place. The type of learning that often occur in Connectivist MOOCs appears to be based on processes that educators indeed wish to encourage in their students in order to better prepare them for the future. There is no doubt therefore that such a change in conceptualizing learning and teaching should be considered in colleges of teacher education; there is also no doubt that resistance will present itself. From a pedagogical point of view, the MOOC phenomena redefines what is meant by ?learning,? ?teaching,? and ?assessment,? and at the same time blurs the boundaries between them. It is not self-evident that the institution, which has its established content foci, instructional approaches, and organizational structure and practices, would welcome courses embodying such departure from what has been defined as normative.
The study sought to listen to the organizational voices regarding an initiative of developing a MOOC for Hebrew-speaking student teachers, while focusing on the Connectivist MOOC as an example of innovation and organizational change. Based on in-depth interviews with stakeholders in the college, and using a methodology for analyzing organizational transformation triggered by the adoption of computing technologies, a narrative network was constructed from story fragments with potential connections. The narrative methodology ? itself mirroring many aspects of Connectivism in the broad sense of emphasizing connections and networks ? enables to compile stories told from different perspectives, based on encounters with the people identified as potential partners, and to trace actions and reactions when the idea of the Connectivist MOOC and its affordances were placed as the focus of the discussion. The stories that emerged from the interactions with those people reflect how such an initiative involves an organizing of people in relation to a technology. In this case, the potential affordances of the technology at the center of the initiative were seen as having a possible destabilizing influence on the existing practices of the organization. Openness emerged as a key issue in the analysis and as playing a crucial part in one of the reconstructed stories, hence the title of this presentation.
Through the analysis of the interviews and of the actions characterizing the implementation of the initiative, we have gained understanding on how the affordances of MOOCs may subvert the mainstream agenda of an organization and its established practices. The rise of the MOOC is relatively young; hence studying how to implement it is also in its infancy. The presentation aims to contribute to this research-in-progress by bringing the teacher educators' point of view.



Speakers
DL

Dalit Levy

Pedagogical Innovator, Kibbutzim College of Education, Technology and the Arts


Friday November 8, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
Painted Horse

11:15am

The Challenges of Evaluating Connectivist MOOCs
In popular media there has been much written of late about MOOCs: massive, open, online courses. But a good deal of that focuses on what have sometimes been called ?xMOOCs,? while there is another model that receives less press, ?cMOOCs,? or ?connectivist MOOCs? (Rodriguez, 2012). Many cMOOCs are grounded in the theory of ?connectivism,? which holds (among other things):
learning is a process of making and traversing connections--both connecting to information sources and to other people (Downes, 2007; Siemens, 2005)
knowledge is distributed across networks (Siemens, 2006); ?Knowledge is . . . literally the set of connections formed by actions and experience? (Downes, 2007)
learning is a continual process of cyclical change through interactions between persons, networks, organizations, institutions (Siemens, 2005)
diversity within networks is crucial to learning and knowledge-generation (Siemens, 2005; Downes, 2009)

Connectivist MOOCs are not focused on distributing content (Cormier and Siemens, 2010), but rather on facilitating the building of connections and creation of new knowledge amongst participants. Several cMOOCs list four main types of activities: aggregating information, remixing it by connecting it to one?s own learning and networks, repurposing by creating new knowledge and artifacts, and feeding all of this forward by sharing. Stephen Downes (2008, 2009) has also identified four elements that characterize a knowledge-generating network, and presumably these should be found in cMOOC networks: diversity, autonomy, interactivity and openness. Finally, cMOOCs do not (usually) have standard learning objects designed to be valid for all participants; instead, each participant may develop their own goals and learning objectives (McAuley, Stewart, Siemens, & Cormier, 2010). This is in part because the curriculum evolves throughout the course, depending on what is aggregated, created, shared and discussed.

The lack of standard objectives and the evolving nature of cMOOCs make it challenging to evaluate their effectiveness. Each participant could conceivably have different objectives and goals for a cMOOC, and these may not be present at first, but may develop as they engage with the course. Further, some participants may not develop objectives or goals at all, preferring instead to simply participate in the course and see what emerges for them. It is possible to gather empirical evidence on whether participants in a cMOOC engaged in aggregation, remixing, repurposing and feeding forward, in part through learning analytics (e.g., Fournier, Kop, & Sitlia, 2011; Kop, 2012), but measuring the value of the connections made for learning and knowledge-generation is much more complicated. One might gather participants? subjective views on the value of the connections they made (e.g., deWaard et al., 2011) but this value may not be apparent until long after the course has been completed, and may not necessarily be apparent to participants themselves at all.

This presentation will address the difficulties in evaluating the effectiveness of cMOOCs, discuss how research published to date on cMOOCs does not adequately address these difficulties, and invite a discussion with the audience on possible ways of using empirical research to evaluate cMOOCs.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER


Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
White Pine

11:15am

Being the Change We Want to See: One Year in to Open Ed
Teachers never know what will trigger significant change. For this presenter, the catalyst to change was OpenEd 2012 in Vancouver. While Open Ed ?12 initiated significant change in an academic library?s approach to affordable learning solutions, collections, staffing, and space, it also caused a deeper look at what libraries are, or are not, doing to support Open Ed.

In ?The Inevitability of Open Access? (C&RL, September 2012), David Lewis acknowledges the potentially disruptive impacts of open access uptake on library collections budgets. He concludes that ?we should do everything we can to encourage and support its growth, because in the end it is a disruption whose success will make our world better? (504). Indeed, librarians have led the world in creating open content commons through the Hathi Trust and OpenLibrary. With library support, tools and directories like Sherpa/RoMEO and the DOAJ have been created that inform open content policies. Librarians have also helped shape the legal and policy frameworks that support open content, including Creative Commons, Science Commons, and the open access mandates of research funding bodies. Librarians have built hundreds of robust open content repositories, and are active in creating new models of open library access, such as the Digital Public Library of America. At a time when our budgets are strained and constricting, where we are losing our battles against publishers for access to ebooks and vendors are increasing their costs unpredictably and copyright battles weigh on campuses, libraries, and scholars, the Open movement is a beacon of hope for librarians.

But what obstructs libraries? deeper involvement in Open Ed? Why are many of the tools and repositories librarians played such a key role in creating remaining isolated from our core collections? Why is the open ethos absent from our core visions? Open content results in a tectonic shift for libraries not only in terms of collections but because truly embracing OER demands a the reconceptualization instructional services, reference services, outreach, digital scholarship, data curation and data services, and more.

This presentation will discuss these themes as well as highlight the steps one public, polytechnic university is braving to take by reimagining collections, spaces, staffing, resources, and partnerships. We will also explore specific strategies for deconstructing barriers and the results of those efforts. Rome wasn?t built in a day?this presentation will show what an Open Education program looks like one year to the day from its inception.

Speakers
SC

Sarah Cohen

Associate University Librarian, California Polytechnic State University


Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Kokopelli

11:15am

(Re)thinking openness in open education
This presentation proposes a formalized characterization of open education projects based on the idea of openness. Some of the main points are as follows: open education is, and should not be, limited to the opening of education to learners, such as providing gratis and distant (time-flexible) learning and credentialing opportunities. It includes opening up the opportunity to educate, and blur the boundaries between the educator and learner.

In general, exploration of the potential of educational use ICT may lead to a more effective and efficient society in terms of teaching, learning, assessing, signaling of competence, and so forth. More open approach to these activities may lead to improvements given that the coordination and transaction cost for these activities decreased due to ICT adoption, and there are untapped resources to be mobilized for these activities. The blurring of the boundaries between service provider and recipients is common to many open-content and open-resource projects, and while it does not necessarily represent an improvement, there is a good chance that equilibrium change to a more open point, involving greater number and more diverse entities for the same activity.

Examined with this perspective, OER is a type of project that opens up not only learning opportunities, but also opportunities to participate into education. It lowers the barriers for learners to play an active part of educating, such as through rating, curating, or revising of existing OER, peer-to-peer teaching in learning communities. So-called xMOOCs, in contrast, is a type of open education that deepens the divide between the learner and educator, a massive scale delivery of finely crafted program. The open credentialing of competency, as in Mozilla Open Badge Initiative, is another project that opens up not just the learning opportunities, but also those of participating into credentialing.

Speakers
avatar for Saera Yoon

Saera Yoon

Associate Professor, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
reading teaching (Russian) literature


Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Painted Horse

11:15am

Pushing EdX to be Open
In the beginning of 2013 Delft University of Technology joined the EdX Consortium. One of the important reason to join EdX was the intended openness. Immediately Delft took the first step to announce that the DelftX MOOCs will have an open-license (CC-BY-NC-SA).
EdX took the next step with open-sourcing the platform. In June the code will be made available via github. The release of the source code marks the first step toward edX's vision of creating an open online learning platform that mirrors the collaborative philosophy of MOOCs themselves and is an invitation to the global community of developers to work with edX to deliver the world's best and most accessible online learning experience.
In this presentation I will go into more details about the open-licensed courses and the open-sourced platform.

Speakers
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

Boardmember Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
Responsible for the production and delivery of all the Open, Online and Blended Courses of TU Delft. This includes OpenCourseWare, MOOCs, ProfEd, Online MSc and blended courses. | I'm also Board member of the Open Education Consortium.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
Arrowhead

11:45am

Starting small in a big way: OER in a large lecture course at UGA
According to the 2011 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), over a third of University of Georgia (UGA) students had unmet financial needs. Textbooks and other educational materials contribute to those financial challenges, costing students an average of $900 to $1200 a year (Wiley, Green & Soares, 2012). The presenters received funding from the state of Georgia to investigate approaches for addressing this issue using open educational resources. At UGA, our greatest probability for impact exists in high enrollment courses that require expensive textbooks. For example, a new, introductory textbook in many science courses costs approximately $150. If a single faculty member teaches two sections of 300 students in a given semester (600 students total), the potential cost saving for those students in a single semester is $90,000. These savings could increase significantly in each subsequent semester as more faculty members adopt OER for their courses. The project was designed to provide a faculty member who teaches large enrollment courses with needed time, incentives, and instructional development resources to make the transition from an expensive textbook to an OER-based course.

In this session, the project team will share the development, support, and deployment of the initiative, as well as next steps. The presenters will discuss their roles and challenges encountered so far, including in areas of planning, faculty support, research, teaching, and learning. Session attendees will have the opportunity to share their experiences with similar initiatives or come away with ideas for new programs on their campuses.

Speakers
SC

Sherry Clouser

Assistant Director of Learning Technologies, UGA Center for Teaching and Learning
Lord, please help me become the person my dogs think I am. --Dawn Ewing
avatar for Denise Domizi

Denise Domizi

Coordinator of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, University of Georgia


Friday November 8, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
White Pine

11:45am

From Chrysalis to Butterfly: Lifecycles of an OER project
The NGLC-funded Bridge to Success project (http://bridge2success.aacc.edu/) reworked successful developmental courses in mathematics and learning development for use in US community colleges. This paper seeks to answer the question, how have the Bridge to Success courses continued to be used and what has been their impact? During the project, the material transcended the remit of its intended audience to impact non-governmental organisations, reaching under-served groups outside of formal education with considerable success. The courses evolved throughout the project?s duration, responding to student and instructor feedback and independent analysis as well as introducing motivational ?challenges? to Learning to Learn as the first step towards the content being badge-ready.

Whilst the project formally ended December 2012, the OER created as part of the Open University (OU)-led project remain available for use by educators and independent learners alike. In the US there is continued use of the material in both the charity and college sectors and analytics show that the materials are also being accessed at significant levels by non-US users. In the UK, the OU is further modifying the courses as part of Adult Education Week and releasing them as MOOCs where the motivational challenges are now fully functioning badges.

Building from data that showed benefits through a comparative study in the college context, this paper will consider what we can tell from a more holistic view of the impact of releasing OER and examine the signs of sustainabililty. We reflect on the advantages of whole course, remixable OER (a strategy recently advocated by Susan Badger as a way forward for the OER movement). Comparing similar types of complete offerings to Bridge to Success, such as OpenStax College, who offer remixable coursebooks, the study presents stakeholder perspectives and the challenges and benefits to those producing and using this type of OER.

Speakers
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Friday November 8, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Kokopelli

11:45am

Promises and Problems of Data Driven Education: One School's Solution in Implementing Teacher-Driven Analysis into OER-Based Classrooms.
Data is a hot topic in online education, but becoming data-driven is a buzz phrase that is easier to talk about than actually implement in a school setting. Open High School of Utah shares its experience with using data in the classroom, including our missteps, successes, and map for future augmentation. OHSU will share its methods and process of bringing meaningful and accessible data-analysis and its application to your teachers.

Speakers
EA

Emily Andersen

Assistant Director, Mountain Heights Academy
Emily Andersen has worked secondary education for 10 ten years as an English and History teacher, administrator, curriculum developer and in a multitude of settings--public, private and charter. Emily was awarded a ISKME fellowship in 2012 and an Association of American Educators grant to forward her students’ online Literary Magazine, The Virtual Inkblot. She has built over 5 online semester courses using OER and is currently the Assistant... Read More →
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.
avatar for Sarah Morse Weston

Sarah Morse Weston

Director of Technology and OER, Mountain Heights Academy
Sarah Weston has worked in secondary education for 18 years, as a teacher, administrator, and curriculum designer. She has built 17 semester courses using Open Educational Resources (OER) and currently oversees all course development and teacher training on building with OER. Sarah was awarded Utah Charter Educator of the Year in 2010; the first online educator to receive the award. Sarah is a regular presenter at national conferences... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Arrowhead

11:45am

Shares Well with Others
In the evolution of educational resources, many different ideas have battled to be fittest. The changing climates of desktop, tablet, and mobile platforms have shaped how teachers and students interact with content. Learning Management Systems have stomped across the landscape, sometimes swiping at each other with tiny arms. But from the long view, if you look through miles of teacher lounges and the petri dishes of start-ups, one thing seems certain: when given delightful content tools, teachers will share well with others.

Blackboard has recently given birth to a new kind of creature. For the first time, you can easily search, share, and collaborate with any educator across multiple platforms. This session will review the evolved ways that instructors can author, revise, tag and discover OER within Blackboard xpLor ?, then embed it richly within any online course.

We will also share notes on how xpLor can provide a level of insight into OER usage that has never been experienced before.

Speakers
BM

Brent Mundy

Director Product Management, Blackboard


Friday November 8, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
Painted Horse

1:15pm

A million here, a million there: Adding up OER savings at WGU
During this presentation we will dive into how Western Governors University prioritizes course redevelopment based on predictive models of student success. As we identify the greatest opportunities for improvement we look to OER for potential cost savings as well. WGU has already implemented high quality OER that is boosting student success and saving millions. We'll describe what's working and how we intend to get more of it.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Caswell

Tom Caswell

Director of Learning Engineering, Learning Objects
I'm a husband, dad, & OER and EdTech guru at Learning Objects. More at http://tomcaswell/about


Friday November 8, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
White Pine

1:15pm

A Path Analysis of Educator Perceptions of Open Educational Resources Using the Technology Acceptance Model
This session explores the influence of self-efficacy and outcome judgment, from social cognitive learning theory, on the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER). Research findings from an online survey conducted from January to March 2013 are presented. The Technology Acceptance Model is used as a framework to analyze cognitive interactions that lead to integrating OER into the professional practice of educators from different settings. Path analysis confirms model fitness and indicates a strong effect between the technical quality of an OER and its perceived usefulness. A discriminant function analysis is used to delve deeper in understanding particular differences among K-12, higher education, and workplace training professionals in their attitudes about the usefulness of OER. The K-12 audience is identified as having a high regard for the usefulness of OER in relation to their work. This finding is interpreted as OER meeting a need for quality resources among K-12 educators who may have less access to up to date digital resources on topics relevant to their instruction. Recommendations for the design of OER to improve perceived ease of use and instructional messaging for K-12 educators conclude the discussion. This session will be of particular interest for those involved in improving the formal use of OER by educators and training professionals.

Speakers
HK

Hope Kelly

e-Learning Coordinator/Doc Student, University of Florida


Friday November 8, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Painted Horse

1:15pm

Reuse, redistribute, revise, and remix, sustainably and with impact
Siyavula Education is a company that is building a sustainable business around open educational resources by maximising accessibility. While our openness is key to our current success it also presents unique challenges for a business. Siyavula was incubated within the Shuttleworth Foundation as an OER project and has now received venture capital from PSG Financial Services.

Of the 12 million learners in government schools in South Africa, 5 million learners currently have an openly-licensed, printed book for at least one subject, this will jump to 9 million learners in January 2014. While the Department of Basic Education has saved approximately ZAR200M (USD 25M) in doing so, the Siyavula business model is not tied to this value proposition.

By focusing on accessibility of the content in a device agnostic way, we have 420,000 (200,000 Maths and 220,000 Science) Grade 10-12 visitors on web and mobile devices and 430,000 (210,000 Math and 220,000 Science) Grade 10-12 visitors on Mxit (a chat client that supports low-end feature phones). The value of using open content, open standards and focusing on access to quality OER resources presents a unique opportunity to have widespread impact in the education sector and necessitate a shift at the policy level.

In addition, it provides the ideal testing ground for business models built around OERs that go beyond cost saving. The lack of remuneration for titles printed and distributed has been a fundamental part of Siyavula?s ability to engage with policy makers and schools but necessitates delivering value elsewhere for sustainability.

Siyavula, despite being a for-profit company, has successfully engaged with sponsors to cover hard costs of title production as they have recognised the leveraged investment that unlocking an open title in partnership with Siyavula represents, giving them national impact and with core content being released under a CC-BY licence.

The massive footprint afforded through accessibility presents further opportunities to deliver premium services and look to analytics to inform strategic decision making at the policy level. In these areas it is possible to add unique value on which Siyavula hinges long-term sustainability. I will present the details of our current business model. I will also discuss how taking the openness value proposition beyond cost-saving benefits has been key to our success as well as the options that we have explored and the challenges that we have faced in finalising our business model.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Horner

Mark Horner

Chief Executive Officer, Siyavula Education
Trying to make the world a better place in my own way. I blog about all of my attempts to get this right at http://www.markhorner.net.


Friday November 8, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Kokopelli

1:15pm

Can it be done? Building a Successful Business Around Open Licensed Software and Content
Building sustainable businesses around open licenses, be it open educational resources or open source software, can be hard. Examples abound of companies that have started with one objective only to later change course or exit the business altogether. This session explores lessons learned from practitioners who have built successful (and not so successful) open education businesses. Principles for success will be outlined as well as recommendations for actions the community can take to ensure a strong vendor ecosystem around these important initiatives.

Speakers
BW

Brian Whitmer

Co-founder, Instructure, Inc.


Friday November 8, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Arrowhead

1:45pm

How the Open Academics Project Saved Students $100,000 and How You Can Too
The path to faculty adoptions of open textbooks is complex. Faculty are often confronted with several common barriers. The Open Academics project is designed to address these barriers, improving the chances that faculty will successfully find and potentially adopt appropriate open textbooks.

This session will discuss how the Open Academics project has worked to overcome these barriers at the University of Minnesota, and how audience members can leverage two key resources developed by Open Academics to achieve similar success elsewhere: the Open Textbook Catalog and a toolkit for organizing campus-based open textbook review programs.

Barrier #1: Faculty don?t know that open textbooks are an option.

?Textbook companies have a sales force to promote and raise awareness of their textbooks. Open textbooks don?t have local sales people, so faculty often don?t know that open textbooks are an option. The Open Academics project proposes to empower staff on campus to help raise awareness of open options - to serve as the open ?sales force.? These local staff will be empowered with a toolkit of information and materials to help faculty find open options.

Barrier #2: Faculty don?t know where to find open textbooks.

?There are many sources of open textbooks, which can make it challenging for faculty to find open textbook options. The Open Academics textbook catalog (http://open.umn.edu) is a directory of over 135 open textbooks that span many disciplines. This single catalog gives faculty one place to go to find open textbook options for their students.

?Barrier #3: Faculty don?t know the quality of open textbooks.

?Faculty are often curious about the quality of open textbooks. The most trusted measure of quality for faculty is peer opinion. The Open Academics textbooks catalog provides a platform to collect faculty reviews of open textbooks, giving faculty a reliable start at gauging quality.

The goal of the Open Academics project is to provide campuses with the tools necessary to overcome the barriers keeping faculty from adopting open textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Jensen

Kristi Jensen

eLearning Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kristi Jensen is the Program Development Lead for the University of Minnesota Libraries eLearning Initiative. She has also served as the Research and Learning Department Director for Social Sciences and Professional Programs, the Head of the John R. Borchert Map Library, and as the Physics and Astronomy librarian. Kristi has worked on a wide range of technology-based projects during her career, including the implementation of the Libraries... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
White Pine

1:45pm

Adopting OER models at a national level. The experience of Wales
As a small agile nation Wales has to maximise resources to the benefit of the Welsh population, economy, and rest of the world. This seminar will explore how all of the universities in Wales (9) worked collaboratively to develop the concept of Wales as an OER nation for higher education and how they were able to influence government policy. This led to the government agreeing to support a statement of intent regarding the future development of OER across the nation. It will also describe some of the challenges and how they were overcome at political, institutional and individual levels and the emerging recognition of the importance of open educational practice in academic practice and delivery.

Speakers

Friday November 8, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Painted Horse

1:45pm

Sure we are all 'open' but when do we get to 'share'?
Since its inception, the open education space has been fragmented by intellectual property differences, a lack of easy-to-use tools, a desire for ownership, and a simple way to brand content. Despite the proliferation of open educational projects, the promise of OER ? the ability to easily remix to innovate ? has not been unlocked. In order to make remixing easy, we must move beyond mere openness to active sharing. New tools and standard formats have been designed to make creating and sharing OER easy.

In this session, our panel will investigate barriers to broader sharing from both faculty and institutional perspectives. We will delve into concerns around commercialization, lack of a central clearinghouse for OER, and OER quality and vetting practices.

We will also take a first look at the new version of the Connexions OER authoring and sharing platform. This new platform, created in partnership with Google, promises to make frictionless remix a reality by combining easy to use authoring tools, state-of-the-art transformation services that automatically generate a myriad of output formats including publisher-quality PDFs and ePubs for use on tablets.

Finally, we will also explore the idea of a "federated OER ecosystem" where individual institutions retain total control over their OER platform, but have the ability to push or pull open content to or from a shared central archive.

Speakers
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →
avatar for Mark Morvant

Mark Morvant

Associate Provost, Teaching & Technology, University of Oklahoma
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, Connexions, Rice University


Friday November 8, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Kokopelli

1:45pm

From Open Courses to Open Curricula: The Next Big Step
Open curricula is not new. Others, including MIT, TU Delft, and the African Virtual University have published degree paths of open courses before. The OpenChem project contributes by its publication of hundreds of hours of video lectures and phased approach to chunking, ancillary materials and translation. In an era of 20,000 open courses (the OCWC membership's aggregated total) and tens of millions of viewers, why is this needed? Why can't we just combine what exists? Why aren't MOOCs enough? How does an open curriculum get reused?

Speakers
LC

Lawrence Cooperman

President, OpenCourseWare Consortium


Friday November 8, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Arrowhead

2:30pm

A Second Chance for First-Year Students: Using OER to Increase Student Success
Mercy College prides itself on providing motivated students the opportunity to acquire a quality higher education in preparation for success as lifelong learners in today?s highly competitive knowledge economy. Many Mercy College students are the first in their families to attend college, and many have obligations beyond education involving work, family and military service. In addition, many face socioeconomic, academic preparedness and financial challenges. As such, many Mercy College students rely upon federal financial aid not only for tuition, but for textbook and other expenses as well. Delays in receiving financial aid can mean delays in purchasing textbooks and other required class materials, sometimes well into the semester. As a result, students fall behind in their classes, become discouraged, and drop out before completing their first year.

In search of a solution to the costs and financial pressures weighing upon our students, Mercy College in 2011 joined the Kaleidoscope Project with the support of a Gates Foundation grant. Our goal was to create, provide and integrate Open Education Resources (OER) into the required General Education curriculum, including courses such as Freshman Seminar, a required course that introduces first-semester students to core competencies such as critical reading, critical thinking, and information literacy.

In fall 2012, Mercy College participated in a self-study project sponsored by the John Gardiner Institute examining the first-year experience. This study revealed high failure rates in the so-called ?killer? core classes, first-year general education courses such as English, Math, and Freshman Seminar. In summer 2013, as part of the resultant efforts to increase first-year student success while decreasing the financial burden, Mercy College will pilot a no-cost, two-week intensive ?encore? of Freshman Seminar that will leverage OER content and infrastructure in giving students who have failed the course during the preceding semester a second opportunity to successfully complete it.

Through a combination of face-to-face classroom instruction, intensive one-on-one tutoring and web-based instructional modules focusing on the embedded core competencies, this pilot intensive will experiment with multiple OER-based approaches and content as we explore fresh pedagogical approaches that most effectively address our students? challenges and needs.

Our presentation will present initial findings of this summer pilot program with emphasis upon the effectiveness of the OER models adopted and employed, while offering suggestions and recommendations for both initial implementation and future expansion. Through a combination of ?hard? quantitative and qualitative outcomes assessment findings blended with the ?soft? reflections of students, faculty and tutoring staff, our presentation will offer a first look at a second chance for first-year student success.

Speakers
ES

Emily Seibert

Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator, Mercy College
I teach and coordinate the Critical Inquiry and Junior Seminar courses at Mercy College. These courses reinforce and assess skills such as critical thinking, reading, writing, speech, and information literacy. I love creating competency-based OER's and incorporating learning modules, digital stories, ePortfolios, and service-learning into curriculum. I also love old television shows, rock concerts, and saving stray cats.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
White Pine

2:30pm

Latin American Open Textbooks Initiative - LATIn
Among the most important barriers for accessing and succeeding in the Latin American Higher Education Institutions (HEI) are the costs of being a university student. Even if there is not tuition to be paid, as in the case of most public HEIs in the region, or through scholarship from the government in private HEIs, other often overlooked costs, most notably the cost of textbooks, are real impediments for low-income prospective and actual students.
This initiative addresses the problem of high cost of textbooks for Higher Education in Latin America. The main pillars of this initiative are a digital ecosystem for the collaborative creation of textbooks, a technological platform to support this ecosystem and the strategies for the adoption of the initiative in Higher Education Institutions of the region. This initiative will encourage and support local professors and authors to contribute with individual sections or chapters that could be assembled into customized books by the whole community. The created books will be freely available to the students in an electronic format or could be legally printed at low cost because there are no license fees to be paid for their distribution. This solution will also contribute to the creation of customized textbooks where each professor could select the sections appropriate for their courses or could freely adapt existing sections to their needs. Also, the local professors will be the sink and source of the knowledge, contextualized to the Latin American Higher Education system.
Professors and academic authors will be the main participants of the initiative, however the low-income students will be the main beneficiaries of the freely available textbooks.

Speakers
XO

Xavier Ochoa

Professor, Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral


Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Kokopelli

2:30pm

Palau Schools OER/iClassroom Pilot
In spring 2011, the Palau islands Ministry of Education implemented an Open Educational Resources (OER) pilot program initially at the Palau High School. The purpose of the pilot was to introduce innovative ways to engage students, enhance delivery of "on-demand" curriculum supportive material as well as to create ways to extend learning beyond the school day using digital learning technology. In 2013, the OER/iClassroom project was expanded to seven middle and elementary schools. The impact of OER on Palau schools... hundreds of thousands of dollars in textbook savings; up-to-date instructional content; and an engaging student learning experience -- with no academic decline by using OER. The pilot success is an OER showcase for the Pacific region.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Stewart

Lee Stewart

Co-Founder / COO, 3W Education Consulting Group
I am passionate about promoting the use of 3.0 digital learning tools combined with Open Educational Resources to create engaging as well as cost-effective "21st century" teaching and learning environments for todays generation of students of all ages - globally! | | My education-technology journey began in 1990 with Education Interactive, a company I founded that offered, at the time, 2.0 digital-based (LaserDisc / CD's) educational tools... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Painted Horse

2:30pm

Inclusive OER and the Floe Project
The Floe Project (Flexible Learning for Open Education) is an open source effort to provide the tools, resources, and advice needed to make OERs more accessible and inclusive to a diversity of learners and content producers. Floe is led by the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University and is funded by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

The Floe community is designing a collection of tools and components that can be embedded in OER content repositories, portals, and web sites. Floe?s Learner Options component enables learners to discover and describe their personal accessibility needs and preferences, giving them the ability to customize how content is presented and controlled. This includes features such as large print, colour contrast, text-to-speech, and content simplification. In combination with Learner Options, the Floe HTML5 Video Player provides personalized media delivery for OERs, including support for synchronized captions and transcripts.

Floe is building authoring components that enable OER producers to label and describe their content with accessibility metadata based on the AccessForAll standard. Resources that include this accessibility metadata can be matched with the learner?s individual needs and preferences, enabling search engines and OER environments to deliver personalized content to the learner.

In addition to these tools and components, Floe?s Inclusive Learning Design Handbook provides OER authors with useful techniques, advice, and resources needed to make their educational content more accessible.

Floe?s tools are increasingly being adopted by OER initiatives such as OER Commons, PHeT, and OERPub, as well as popular content management systems such as WordPress.

This session will provide participants with an overview of how Floe Project?s tools and resources are helping support accessibility and inclusion within the OER community. We will also cover how Floe relates to an international effort to provide ?one size fits one? accessibility infrastructure, including projects such as the Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure, Cloud4all, and the U.S. Department of Education-funded Preferences for Global Access. We will also share useful hands-on techniques and advice for how to address accessibility in your own projects and resources.

Speakers
avatar for Jess Mitchell

Jess Mitchell

Senior Manager, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jess Mitchell is Senior Manager, Research + Design at the Inclusive Design Research Centre (http://idrc.ocad.ca). She manages large-scale international projects and initiatives focusing on fostering innovation within diverse communities while achieving outcomes that benefit everyone. | Jess is a community leader who works in a highly collaborative, open, and iterative manner borrowing methods from complex project management, agile... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Arrowhead

3:00pm

Open solutions to a 'national crisis': The impact of open educational resources on teacher-education in India
Open educational resources (OER) are increasingly regarded as an important part of the global educational landscape. Asian countries are very much involved in the OER movement, with India, China and Pakistan standing out for the quantity of OER each country has published (Dhanarajan & Porter, 2013). Arguably, OER offer particular benefits for the learners of Asia - a continent which has ?the largest number of ultra-poor people in the world? (Dhanarajan & Porter, 2013, p. vii). One area in which OER have the potential to make a dramatic and extensive impact in Asia is within the field of teacher education, where the insufficient supply of teachers, a limited capacity for teacher training, disparities in pupil-teacher ratios, the large numbers of unqualified teachers, and inadequate continuing professional development (Commonwealth of Learning, 2013) are resulting in inadequate access to education and poor standards of learning for those already in the education system.

The challenges above are all present in India, where there is an estimated 1.33 million shortfall in teachers and many existing teachers are unqualified. Indeed, India?s Annual Status of Education (ASER) 2012 report identified ?an alarming degeneration? (ASER 2012, p. 1) in educational standards in Indian primary schools and a ?national crisis in learning? (p. 2). This paper presents research by the UK Open University?s OER Research Hub (www.oerresearchhub.org) (OERRH) on the impact of OER on teacher education and learning standards achieved by two India-based projects: TESS-India and Karnataka OER. TESS-India (Teacher Education in School Sector India) is informed by its sister project TESSA (Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa) (Wolfenden, 2008) and like that project TESS-India aims to use OER to reduce pressure on teacher education institutions, enabling them to deliver quality teacher training, at scale and speed. The TESS-India project will eventually work in partnership with education institutions across seven Indian states to create the biggest network of freely available, high quality, teacher education resources in India. Karnataka OER is more advanced in its development than TESS-India and comprises a wiki-based repository of OER intended to support the professional development and improved practice of practising teachers. The Karnataka OER wiki is built by a community of educators who are engaged in the continuous creation, review, curation and publishing of digital curricular resources.
A mixed methods strategy is being employed to explore the impact of OER on teacher education within these two projects. To date, an initial scoping study focused on teacher education practices in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar has gathered evidence of existing resource use through interviews with teacher-educators and with Principals of the District Institutes for Education and Training (DIETs), and evidence of existing teacher-education practice via lesson observations. It is planned that the research will be extended over the coming months to include surveys, interviews and lesson observations with OER-using teachers and teacher educators across India. At Open Ed we will report the findings from the Karnataka OER and TESS-India studies and discuss the implications for Commonwealth countries across the globe

Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Fellow, OER Research Hub, The Open University, UK
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about... well, meet me at Open Ed 2014 to find out more...


Friday November 8, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
White Pine

3:00pm

Ecosystem: A Threshold Moment for Open Learning Materials
The early history of the most groundbreaking technologies is often a dismal one. They might lumber along as outliers for years before the right elements come together and suddenly catapult them from the fringe into the mainstream. Online videos of lecture courses, for example, have been around for more than a decade but it wasn?t until certain conditions were satisfied that we would have the phenomenon of MOOCs. To turn the commonplace academic video lecture into perhaps an academy-altering force one needed to assemble first-rate content and maintain the integrity of a complete course, and do this with the imprimatur of top universities. This helped turn an already tired technology into a truly disruptive one.
A similar pattern is shaping up for OERs and it is unfolding across three closely related but distinct stages, viz., ?enthusiasm,? ?quality,? and ?formalization.? The first stage emerged when faculty at institutions like MIT and Rice established repositories for OERs. They may not have had a business plan, but the dream to make academic content free, flexible, and openly shareable sparked great excitement. While difficult to realize partly because of the unevenness of OER quality, the enthusiasm itself has been critical?sustaining the dream and helping to inspire those who would bring it to the second stage, the emergence of ?publisher quality? OERs.
Rice University-based OpenStax has collected large sums in foundation support to produce OERs that are on par with their commercial rivals. The production of these open license textbooks is by itself groundbreaking and extraordinary; they signal that the quality barrier has now fallen.
The early results at OpenStax have also been encouraging, with the physics book, for example, winning 3% of adoptions in less than a year. The OpenStax catalog is also growing rapidly; even now it offers materials for courses taken by millions of students. This is one effort at one university; imagine what will happen as others participate--and they will.
High quality OERs, however, will not alone suffice for mainstream use because quality isn?t the only barrier. Repositories still exist as silos, there?s little alignment of interests at the local level across the key stakeholders?administrators, faculty, and students, there are ease of use issues, and there?s not enough online support for the materials themselves (assessment, machine learning, homework, etc.). Just as quality content required the formalization of video lectures through the MOOCs, so too will OpenStax and other high quality OER content require a robust centralized platform. This need gives rise to the third stage of OER development, formalization, and it?s happening now.
The platform race is on and this talk will discuss the approaches that various organizations are taking to create the right ecosystem. Sapling, Lumen Learning, Connexions, Wiley, and panOpen, among others, are all proceeding in different but related ways. It?s a good and valuable competition for the OER movement as it provides the final component that, taken together with other two, will fundamentally reshape the way academic domain knowledge is produced and shared.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Jacobs

Brian Jacobs

Founder/CEO, panOpen


Friday November 8, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Kokopelli

3:00pm

Evaluating OER Quality
The Washington state legislature found that the recent adoption of Common Core standards provided an opportunity for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction to identify a library of current, high-quality, openly licensed courseware that could be accessed by K-12 school districts statewide.

It may be free, but is it any good?? The question of quality is one of the overriding issues in the OER field. To address that issue, Washington state has developed a process for evaluating Common Core-aligned OER materials. In April 2013, groups of math and ELA educators convened to review OER materials in Algebra 1 and select ELA units. Results of this review as well as all the review tools are available to share as districts consider utilizing open resources. This session will cover the rubrics, process, and outcomes used in the evaluation process.

Objectives
1. Participants will understand district quality and implementation concerns for K12 OER materials.
2. Participants will understand the issues behind Washington?s OER rubric, including a discussion of material grain-size, reuse of existing rubrics, scoring, and sharing.
3. Participants will learn about Washington state?s experiences, both good and bad, with an OER review process.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Painted Horse

3:00pm

Solving the 4Rs with Common Cartridge
Common Cartridge adoption has grown rapidly in the last few years and is now one of the easiest ways to make your content available across learning platforms. We will discuss:
- The data model
- How to organize your content
- Aligning content to standards/outcomes
- Supported assessment options
- Converting between different content formats
- How new features allow for light-weight content sharing
- Future enhancements

Speakers
avatar for Bracken Mosbacker

Bracken Mosbacker

Software Engineer, Instructure
Talk to me about open standards like LTI and Common Cartridge, and their relation to OER.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
Arrowhead

3:30pm

Gateway to Open Resources
When the Texas Education Agency decided to open a gateway for educational resources, they launched an enormous number of materials. Educational resources initially created to support courses inside of a LMS were re-purposed in order to share the materials with IHE partners and parents. Within the gateway, educators can access over 100 Kid2Kid videos, 2000 interactive exercises, and additional content to support student learning in grades 8-12 in core content areas. Join us as we share this resources and discuss how this resource might assist you as you develop open educational materials.

Speakers
avatar for Paula Moeller

Paula Moeller

Director, College Readiness Initiatives, University of Texas at Austin
Open content to develop academically ready students in high school and at the university level.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Kokopelli

3:30pm

Technology and Inovation with OER's
The Canadian Wildlife Federation's (CWF) main mandate is around Environmental Education and as such have developed many Open Education Resources to assist in supporting teachers, such as Project Wild, Below Zero, Climate Change, Online resources, and our Voices of the North series. In addition we have sponsored the CWF Africa to America?s unsupported row by 4 young gentlemen whose mission, in the 100 day row, is scientific research on multiple levels around the Ocean, Sleep deprivation, Webinars around the Ocean/what the rowers are seeing, and education. The presentation will focus on relating the findings (both Scientific and non-Scientific) of the Row along with sites, resources, to introduce teachers to other new and upcoming events from the Canadian Wildlife Federation, eLearning opportunities, and how the information can be connected with curriculum from a cross curricular component.

Speakers
RM

Randy McLeod

Education Manager, Canadian Wildlife Federation


Friday November 8, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Painted Horse

3:30pm

MOOCseums: Using the Open Movement to Invigorate Local Museums
The societal institution of the museum, a pillar in American and global cultures for over 200 years, faces unprecedented challenges to its survival.  As the creation and distribution of culture, media, information and content shifts from longstanding producers to an ever-expanding world of producer-users (Benkler, 2006), museums have struggled to adapt their practices.  Museums, institutions designed to classify, display and care for culturally and historically relevant artifacts (S. 3984, 2010), have long worried about how methods of massive publication could harm its status as an authority and distributor of these artifacts.  This is despite research showing the benefit open access and digital distribution can provide for the museum as a culturally defined knowledge base and learning center (Simon, 2010), one people will continue to visit despite the ubiquity of its artifacts in the public sphere (Berger, 1972).  Projects such as Steve.Museum and GLAM-WIKI have utilized open access methodologies to place digital artifacts in the public sphere, producing crowdsourced definitions and tags for a greater public use.  While noteworthy, these initiatives are limited in scope, utilized primarily by groups of museum administrators.  Digital technologies incorporating the open movement have yet to be utilized to engage museums? extensive population of patrons and members, nor have they been woven into existing museum education departments. 
An opportunity exists for museums to utilize open access methodology and open educational resources in creating a digital space to provide unique and authentic interaction with cultural artifacts and experts.  This presentation details one such experiment: a model for museums to engage in open online courses regarding collections or traveling exhibits.  Using George Siemens? connectivism (2005, 2008) as both a learning theory and pedagogical model, these courses will utilize open platforms, communication tools and resources to create a digital experience tied to the museum?s mission.  A museum can utilize open software, open resources and open networks to design a course of specified length, organizing facilitators to gear discussion and provide scaffolding for course patrons as they navigate topics and projects.  The advent of digital publishing, social media and low-cost communication tools can allow a unique perspective of and access to the epicenter of the museum and its artifact creators and scholars, something different from yet complimentary to an in-person visit or course.
This research-in-progress is a case study of one such museum adopting an open online course as supplement to a travelling collection.  This moderate-sized museum (waiting for IRB clearance to announce) will offer a four- to six-week course organized around a traveling collection of contemporary photography.  Patrons of the course will engage with each other and the facilitators through a mix of open content, discussion boards, social media, personal digital artifacts, synchronous class sessions, master classes with experts and artists, and the development of their own digital artifacts and photography.  As similar exhibits have displayed at other regional museums, the museum hopes to see how offering an open course can affect interest in and patronage of the museum, both on-line and tangible.  

Speakers
avatar for Rolin Moe

Rolin Moe

Doctoral Candidate, Pepperdine University
Authentic learning environments.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
White Pine

3:30pm

The Future of Open: Getting Students to Become Partners in OER Creation and Curation
Perspective often depends upon where one stands. One of the best things about an open textbook is that instructors can easily "sprinkle in" additional information. For example, a historian in North Carolina may wish to see more examples about the New South in her textbook. Another may wish to see greater emphasis on labor history beyond strikes or Native American history beyond removal.

The "bleeding edge" of open not only allows instructors the freedom to create better books, it permits them to involve students in the process. David Trowbridge will share how students in Appalachia converted a standard U.S. history textbook into a living document that uses examples from their own region alongside the more familiar narratives from Seneca Falls to Selma and Stonewall. Students worked collectively, researching the history of women's suffrage, civil rights, and a dozen other topics. They debated which examples to include, as well as what to leave out. What better way to demonstrate that all history is local and scholars make decisions about the past?

In some ways, teaching is like jazz composition. We all have a basic melody to follow. After that, it?s all about adjustment and improvisation and we make changes each semester based on what worked. "Open" allows instructors to make those same adjustments to their books and other learning materials. Perhaps equally important, it allows students to become active agents in their own education.

Speakers
DT

David Trowbridge

Associate Professor/Director AAAS, Marshall University
I have the best job in the world.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
Arrowhead