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Impacts of OER on Cost and Student Success [clear filter]
Thursday, November 7
 

10:45am

OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis
The average U.S. college student spends more than $1,000 per year on textbooks and supplies, a significant expense on top of already burdensome college costs. Textbook prices continue to soar four times faster than inflation, and many commonly-used texts cost over $200 a piece. The U.S. market is estimated at $8.8 billion, with just five publishers in control of the vast majority of sales.

Open textbooks and OER offer a compelling and common-sense solution to these challenges, and for the last six years, the Student PIRGs and other advocacy groups have worked to win support for OER through this lens.

The potential is huge: With today's rapidly changing student preferences, open textbooks could revolutionize the way textbooks are bought and sold - the full text is offered free online, low-cost hard copies can be sold in the bookstore, and a wide range of print and digital formats are available online. This virtually eliminates affordability concerns while enabling all students to have unfettered access to the text starting the first day of the course.

This session will provide a campaign update from the front lines of the textbook affordability front, focusing on how much progress OER has made as a solution. This will include the latest developments in the public debate around textbook costs, new research quantifying OER savings, analysis of how the publishers are responding, and specific recommendations for how audience members can join or further the cause.

Speakers

Thursday November 7, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
White Pine

11:15am

The CC-OLI Evaluation Report

Since 2002, Carnegie Mellon University’s Open Learning Initiative has taken a science-based approach to the creation and improvement of open, online courses that have demonstrably improved learner outcomes and improved educational productivity.  The Community College Open Learning Initiative (CC-OLI) has been a multi-year effort to build upon the success of that approach by targeting community college courses with high enrollment and low success rates.   Teams of community college faculty have joined in this community-based research project for the development, dissemination and evaluation of 4 gatekeeper courses, all with the goal of increasing student success by 25%.  Faculty from hundreds of institutions have now been involved in the development, use and evaluation of courses in Statistics, Anatomy Physiology, Biology and Psychology.

 This session will offer an overview of the results of the CC-OLI project, presenting results from the formal evaluation study, as well as lessons learned in the development, improvement, dissemination and study of these courses.  Specific topics include:

 A review of the course development process—how do we scale multi-institution, team-based course creation?

 A look at dissemination – how do we promote adoption of these and other OER?

 A discussion of faculty use – what can be done to best support faculty in successfully incorporating these types of materials into their practice?

 Evaluation study results – where and how were the courses and tools effective in contributing to student and faculty success?

 Recommendations for future studies– what have we learned about the challenge evaluation work in this context?

 The future – what’s next for the Open Learning Initiative?


Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Executive Director Simon Initiative; Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
Norman Bier has spent his career at the intersection of learning and technology, working to expand access to and improve the quality of education. He is currently the Executive Director of the Simon Initiative and the Director of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
White Pine

11:45am

A Year in the Trenches with TOTAL-OER! An Artichoke's Story of Survival
In the Spring of 2012, the math department at SCC made the commitment to use only Open Educational Resources in their developmental mathematics courses and for college algebra. Along with that commitment came the realization that replacing the existing course materials involved much more than finding textbooks. Textbooks needed to be adopted and modified to fit the curriculum, workbooks and videos needed developed for tutorials and practice problems, online homework software needed refined and configured and instructors materials had to be created.

This kicked off what turned out to be a mad scramble and a massive amount of activity to prepare for the fall semester. The activity continued through the fall and spring as faculty made efforts to improve and enhance the materials even further. Along the way, the teams ran into obstacles, made compromises and experienced success.

Our results have been overwhelmingly positive for both students and faculty. 40+ instructors in 65 course sections utilized the OER materials and the cost savings for students in Fall 2012 were well over $180,000. Results of a student/faculty survey indicated that most felt that the materials met their needs both inside and outside the classroom as well or better than high cost textbooks.

In this session, our faculty team will:
? Describe how the project came about and why it was important.
? Share the process used to bring together existing and newly developed OER Materials to create a complete learning system.
? Share samples of the OER Materials developed, including:
o Samples of OER books and workbook materials.
o Samples of created resources including Livescribe videos, Softchalk lessons, and Screencasts.
o The configuration of the online homework system (MathAS), including the complete set of online Homework/Quiz questions.
? Discuss the challenges faced and how they were meet, including:
o Ensuring that faculty, full time and adjunct, felt included in the process and had the resources they needed.
o Printing and istribution of the materials and working with the Bookstore.
o Licensing and copyright issues
? Share the results of the project in terms of student success and student/instructor feedback.
? Share how the materials are being adopted and adapted at other colleges within the Maricopa Community College District.
? Discuss how the project is going to be maintained and enhanced as an ongoing living educational system.
? Give idea and resources for other colleges to pursue Total OER.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Gaudet

Donna Gaudet

Mathematics Faculty/Department Chair, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for William Meacham

William Meacham

Math/Computer Science Faculty, Scottsdale Community College


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
White Pine

1:15pm

Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation: Creating a path towards an affordable, accredited higher education together
Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation: Creating a path towards an affordable, accredited higher education together
At last year?s Open Ed Conference, both Excelsior College and the Saylor Foundation presented on how they would utilize OER to offer a path towards an affordable higher education and touched on the partnership that was forming between the two. One year has passed and the partnership is in full swing. We have 5 Saylor courses matched with 5 of Excelsior?s UExcel examinations that learners can take to earn credit on a regionally accredited college transcript. The courses are free and the exams cost the learner $95 ? indeed an affordable path towards achieving actual college credit.
In this presentation, we will talk about how the partnership was created, explore the process of matching courses to credit-bearing exams, and dive into the data collected on student participation, completion, and success on exam taking. We will show how separating learning from credit can create an affordable path to credit that can work with multiple sources of OER and can be scaled to large numbers of learners.

Speakers
DR

Devon Ritter

Special Projects Associate, The Saylor Foundation


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
White Pine

1:45pm

Community College Consortium Save Students Millions and Expands Access to High-Quality Education
The Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources is a community of over 200 colleges promoting the adoption of OER to enhance teaching and learning and expand access to high-quality education. Through monthly professional development webinars and in-person workshops for faculty and staff, consortium members share best practices to find and adopt high-quality open educational resources to reduce costs to students and improve student success. In addition to measuring the savings, member colleges are surveying students and faculty to determine learning outcomes in courses and departments where OER has replaced the traditional instructional materials.

Hear from OER leaders at Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Hartnell College, Houston Community College, Scottsdale College, and Tacoma College who have developed OER faculty adopter communities on their campuses to increase student success through lower costs and expanded access.

Bluegrass Community and Technical College in Kentucky has saved students over $100, 000 in textbooks costs over the last two years through adoption of open educational resources. Primary savings have been in the Geography department but other disciplines are also active. In addition to creating web pages to help faculty find OER more easily, an OER Steering Committee is being formed to further OER adoption throughout the college.

Hartnell College in California has multiple disciplines including Criminal Justice that utilize open and affordable educational resources. The college has recently developed tools to measure student retention and outcomes by course and semester. They will share information on how the use of OER impacts student success.

The math department at Scottsdale College in Arizona started adopting OER in 2010 and within three years converted its entire math curriculum through pre-calculus to use open educational resources. This has resulted in savings to students of over $250,000 per year. Survey feedback has indicated a majority of students believe the OER-based materials are as good or better than traditional textbooks they have used.

Tacoma Community College in Washington started the two-year ?Liberate $250,000? OER Student Savings project in fall of 2012 and has already exceeded that savings in the first year. The goal of the project is to create a clearinghouse of materials that instructors can choose from so they don?t have to be dependent on the textbook for each course. Some instructors may still choose to use textbooks; it will depend on the requirements of the each course and instructor.

Speakers
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Outreach, OpenCourseWare Consortium
I am passionate about expanding access to education through the adoption of open textbooks and open educational resources. As the Community College Outreach Director at the Open Courseware Consortium, I work with faculty and staff at community colleges to create awareness and share... Read More →
avatar for Donna Gaudet

Donna Gaudet

Mathematics Faculty/Department Chair, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OER Project Director, Pierce College
Librarian, AdministratorI am the OER Project Director at Tacoma Community College and I believe that adopting, adapting and accessing OER empowers faculty, students and administrations to grow educational opportunities. I've been a user, a pusher, a creator and a teacher of OER. (From... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
White Pine

2:30pm

The Impact of OER Textbook Adoption on Student Learning in Eight Post-Secondary Courses.
An increasing number of faculty are embracing OER as a replacement for traditional textbooks in post-secondary schools. The National OER Impact Study collects student outcome data for courses using OER and compares it to data from matched control groups of students using traditional textbooks in order to examine whether OER adoption measurably affects student learning. Data from this study comes from schools using Open Course Library (OCL) of the Washington State Board of Community and Technical College (WSBCTC), schools involved in the Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative, and some teachers who have adopted textbooks from OpenStax.

We also provide updates on our research considering student and faculty perceptions of OER curricular materials.

We present results and challenges from the data collected in the 2012-2013 school year. This data includes cost comparison data for courses and updated information about the total amount of student savings produced by these OER initiatives.

We discuss future directions for OER research suggested by this study, as well as the implications that this research has for the OER community in general.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, BYU
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent over 20 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my colleagues... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
White Pine

3:00pm

The Impact of OER Science Textbook Adoption on Student Learning in Secondary Schools.
In 2011-2012, 18 teachers in earth systems, biology, and chemistry adopted OER textbooks to replace traditional publisher-produced textbooks. 43% of all students enrolled in these courses used the OER texts.

Our study examines the impact of OER textbook adoption on student science learning. We collected student data on 2012 and 2011 state science criterion referenced test (CRT) scores, student GPA data, and student demographic data for 4,183 students, as well as teacher effectiveness data. Using the statistical technique propensity score matching, we created matched groups. We then analyzed these groups using multiple regression and found that controlling for variables like student ability, student demographics, and teacher, students using OER textbooks scored significantly higher on the state CRTs.

We discuss possible explanations for this observed difference as well as limitations of the study. We also discuss what implications this study has for future directions of OER research.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, BYU
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent over 20 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my colleagues... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
White Pine

3:30pm

What We Know about OER and its Effect on Students: A Literature Review
This systematic review of literature aims to answer three guiding questions: (1) What evidence exists that the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) textbooks in secondary and higher education leads to comparable student educational outcomes as traditional curricular materials? (2) How does literature pertaining to evaluating OER compare to the literature evaluating textbook quality and adoption in general? and (3) What does a systematic review of these two literature domains suggest about future directions for OER research? The reviewer concludes that the OER community should use systematic and rigorous studies of empirical impacts of open textbook adoption to add rigor and respectability to the community?s body of research. Research from the literature on general textbooks provides insight as to what future OER research might look like.

Speakers
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, BYU
avatar for John Hilton III

John Hilton III

Researcher, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer, Lumen Learning
I've spent over 20 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to students, faculty, institutions, companies, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, my colleagues... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:55pm
White Pine
 
Friday, November 8
 

10:45am

How OER Scales the Teacher-Student Relationship, Not the Classroom
Education started with a single educator teaching a single student. This model has evolved over time, with educators teaching larger and larger groups of students. Now, technology, such as MOOCs, is pushing an even more imbalanced model, with one teacher working with 20,000 or more students. But what if technology, powered by open educational resources (OER), could scale the one-to-one teaching experience - not the classroom size? While the rise of MOOCs allow for mass attendance in courses, scaling up class sizes does not scale up the valuable, personalized teacher-student relationship. However, additional innovations in technology can address the issue of oversized classes.

The wealth of OER online provides a solution - with technology, we can make personalized teacher-student relationships possible in a large classroom setting. The accessibility of OER in the classroom is a huge potential game changer in how educators, institutions and students see technology and open education. The volume of OER content has reached critical mass and OER now is uniquely positioned to scale the teacher-student relationship. Unlike closed content, open resources can be experimented with by many educators, students, and learning systems without risk of copyright issues. The volume of experimentation with open content will dwarf the adaptive learning tests done by traditional, closed content publishers. With more smart people trying many different ideas, it will be OER that is the backbone of the adaptive, scaled teacher technologies.

Building open, personalized instruction channels opens the floodgates for students to get real-time responses to their individual needs, as they would in a historical one-on-one teacher-student relationship. Technology enables a scaled teacher relationship with personalized content that is structured and modularized, asynchronous student-paced learning, and competency-based education not driven by seat time.

To fuel this teacher-student relationship, educators have a wealth of open educational resources to pull from. These resources are open to remixing and repurposing in education, are customizable to students with different learning styles, and there?s no shortage of information to go around. Learning products that organize OER into modular content that can be customized for students? needs and enhance a personalized teacher-student relationship.

Speakers

Friday November 8, 2013 10:45am - 11:10am
White Pine

11:15am

The Challenges of Evaluating Connectivist MOOCs
In popular media there has been much written of late about MOOCs: massive, open, online courses. But a good deal of that focuses on what have sometimes been called ?xMOOCs,? while there is another model that receives less press, ?cMOOCs,? or ?connectivist MOOCs? (Rodriguez, 2012). Many cMOOCs are grounded in the theory of ?connectivism,? which holds (among other things):
learning is a process of making and traversing connections--both connecting to information sources and to other people (Downes, 2007; Siemens, 2005)
knowledge is distributed across networks (Siemens, 2006); ?Knowledge is . . . literally the set of connections formed by actions and experience? (Downes, 2007)
learning is a continual process of cyclical change through interactions between persons, networks, organizations, institutions (Siemens, 2005)
diversity within networks is crucial to learning and knowledge-generation (Siemens, 2005; Downes, 2009)

Connectivist MOOCs are not focused on distributing content (Cormier and Siemens, 2010), but rather on facilitating the building of connections and creation of new knowledge amongst participants. Several cMOOCs list four main types of activities: aggregating information, remixing it by connecting it to one?s own learning and networks, repurposing by creating new knowledge and artifacts, and feeding all of this forward by sharing. Stephen Downes (2008, 2009) has also identified four elements that characterize a knowledge-generating network, and presumably these should be found in cMOOC networks: diversity, autonomy, interactivity and openness. Finally, cMOOCs do not (usually) have standard learning objects designed to be valid for all participants; instead, each participant may develop their own goals and learning objectives (McAuley, Stewart, Siemens, & Cormier, 2010). This is in part because the curriculum evolves throughout the course, depending on what is aggregated, created, shared and discussed.

The lack of standard objectives and the evolving nature of cMOOCs make it challenging to evaluate their effectiveness. Each participant could conceivably have different objectives and goals for a cMOOC, and these may not be present at first, but may develop as they engage with the course. Further, some participants may not develop objectives or goals at all, preferring instead to simply participate in the course and see what emerges for them. It is possible to gather empirical evidence on whether participants in a cMOOC engaged in aggregation, remixing, repurposing and feeding forward, in part through learning analytics (e.g., Fournier, Kop, & Sitlia, 2011; Kop, 2012), but measuring the value of the connections made for learning and knowledge-generation is much more complicated. One might gather participants? subjective views on the value of the connections they made (e.g., deWaard et al., 2011) but this value may not be apparent until long after the course has been completed, and may not necessarily be apparent to participants themselves at all.

This presentation will address the difficulties in evaluating the effectiveness of cMOOCs, discuss how research published to date on cMOOCs does not adequately address these difficulties, and invite a discussion with the audience on possible ways of using empirical research to evaluate cMOOCs.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, The University of British Columbia
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy


Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:40am
White Pine

11:45am

Starting small in a big way: OER in a large lecture course at UGA
According to the 2011 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), over a third of University of Georgia (UGA) students had unmet financial needs. Textbooks and other educational materials contribute to those financial challenges, costing students an average of $900 to $1200 a year (Wiley, Green & Soares, 2012). The presenters received funding from the state of Georgia to investigate approaches for addressing this issue using open educational resources. At UGA, our greatest probability for impact exists in high enrollment courses that require expensive textbooks. For example, a new, introductory textbook in many science courses costs approximately $150. If a single faculty member teaches two sections of 300 students in a given semester (600 students total), the potential cost saving for those students in a single semester is $90,000. These savings could increase significantly in each subsequent semester as more faculty members adopt OER for their courses. The project was designed to provide a faculty member who teaches large enrollment courses with needed time, incentives, and instructional development resources to make the transition from an expensive textbook to an OER-based course.

In this session, the project team will share the development, support, and deployment of the initiative, as well as next steps. The presenters will discuss their roles and challenges encountered so far, including in areas of planning, faculty support, research, teaching, and learning. Session attendees will have the opportunity to share their experiences with similar initiatives or come away with ideas for new programs on their campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Sherry Clouser

Sherry Clouser

Assistant Director of Learning Technologies, UGA Center for Teaching and Learning
Lord, please help me become the person my dogs think I am. --Dawn Ewing
avatar for Denise Domizi

Denise Domizi

Coordinator of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, University of Georgia


Friday November 8, 2013 11:45am - 12:10pm
White Pine

1:15pm

A million here, a million there: Adding up OER savings at WGU
During this presentation we will dive into how Western Governors University prioritizes course redevelopment based on predictive models of student success. As we identify the greatest opportunities for improvement we look to OER for potential cost savings as well. WGU has already implemented high quality OER that is boosting student success and saving millions. We'll describe what's working and how we intend to get more of it.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Caswell

Tom Caswell

Director of Learning Engineering, Learning Objects
I'm a husband, dad, & OER and EdTech guru at Learning Objects. More at http://tomcaswell/about


Friday November 8, 2013 1:15pm - 1:40pm
White Pine

1:45pm

How the Open Academics Project Saved Students $100,000 and How You Can Too
The path to faculty adoptions of open textbooks is complex. Faculty are often confronted with several common barriers. The Open Academics project is designed to address these barriers, improving the chances that faculty will successfully find and potentially adopt appropriate open textbooks.

This session will discuss how the Open Academics project has worked to overcome these barriers at the University of Minnesota, and how audience members can leverage two key resources developed by Open Academics to achieve similar success elsewhere: the Open Textbook Catalog and a toolkit for organizing campus-based open textbook review programs.

Barrier #1: Faculty don?t know that open textbooks are an option.

?Textbook companies have a sales force to promote and raise awareness of their textbooks. Open textbooks don?t have local sales people, so faculty often don?t know that open textbooks are an option. The Open Academics project proposes to empower staff on campus to help raise awareness of open options - to serve as the open ?sales force.? These local staff will be empowered with a toolkit of information and materials to help faculty find open options.

Barrier #2: Faculty don?t know where to find open textbooks.

?There are many sources of open textbooks, which can make it challenging for faculty to find open textbook options. The Open Academics textbook catalog (http://open.umn.edu) is a directory of over 135 open textbooks that span many disciplines. This single catalog gives faculty one place to go to find open textbook options for their students.

?Barrier #3: Faculty don?t know the quality of open textbooks.

?Faculty are often curious about the quality of open textbooks. The most trusted measure of quality for faculty is peer opinion. The Open Academics textbooks catalog provides a platform to collect faculty reviews of open textbooks, giving faculty a reliable start at gauging quality.

The goal of the Open Academics project is to provide campuses with the tools necessary to overcome the barriers keeping faculty from adopting open textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Ernst

Dave Ernst

CIO, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Jensen

Kristi Jensen

eLearning Librarian, University of Minnesota
Kristi Jensen is the Program Development Lead for the eLearning Support Initiative at the University of Minnesota Libraries. She co-manages the Libraries' Partnership for Affordable Content grant program, is working with campus partners (the Center for Educational Innovation, Academic... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 1:45pm - 2:10pm
White Pine

2:30pm

A Second Chance for First-Year Students: Using OER to Increase Student Success
Mercy College prides itself on providing motivated students the opportunity to acquire a quality higher education in preparation for success as lifelong learners in today?s highly competitive knowledge economy. Many Mercy College students are the first in their families to attend college, and many have obligations beyond education involving work, family and military service. In addition, many face socioeconomic, academic preparedness and financial challenges. As such, many Mercy College students rely upon federal financial aid not only for tuition, but for textbook and other expenses as well. Delays in receiving financial aid can mean delays in purchasing textbooks and other required class materials, sometimes well into the semester. As a result, students fall behind in their classes, become discouraged, and drop out before completing their first year.

In search of a solution to the costs and financial pressures weighing upon our students, Mercy College in 2011 joined the Kaleidoscope Project with the support of a Gates Foundation grant. Our goal was to create, provide and integrate Open Education Resources (OER) into the required General Education curriculum, including courses such as Freshman Seminar, a required course that introduces first-semester students to core competencies such as critical reading, critical thinking, and information literacy.

In fall 2012, Mercy College participated in a self-study project sponsored by the John Gardiner Institute examining the first-year experience. This study revealed high failure rates in the so-called ?killer? core classes, first-year general education courses such as English, Math, and Freshman Seminar. In summer 2013, as part of the resultant efforts to increase first-year student success while decreasing the financial burden, Mercy College will pilot a no-cost, two-week intensive ?encore? of Freshman Seminar that will leverage OER content and infrastructure in giving students who have failed the course during the preceding semester a second opportunity to successfully complete it.

Through a combination of face-to-face classroom instruction, intensive one-on-one tutoring and web-based instructional modules focusing on the embedded core competencies, this pilot intensive will experiment with multiple OER-based approaches and content as we explore fresh pedagogical approaches that most effectively address our students? challenges and needs.

Our presentation will present initial findings of this summer pilot program with emphasis upon the effectiveness of the OER models adopted and employed, while offering suggestions and recommendations for both initial implementation and future expansion. Through a combination of ?hard? quantitative and qualitative outcomes assessment findings blended with the ?soft? reflections of students, faculty and tutoring staff, our presentation will offer a first look at a second chance for first-year student success.

Speakers
ES

Emily Seibert

Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator, Mercy College
I teach and coordinate the Critical Inquiry and Junior Seminar courses at Mercy College. These courses reinforce and assess skills such as critical thinking, reading, writing, speech, and information literacy. I love creating competency-based OER's and incorporating learning modules... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 2:55pm
White Pine

3:00pm

Open solutions to a 'national crisis': The impact of open educational resources on teacher-education in India
Open educational resources (OER) are increasingly regarded as an important part of the global educational landscape. Asian countries are very much involved in the OER movement, with India, China and Pakistan standing out for the quantity of OER each country has published (Dhanarajan & Porter, 2013). Arguably, OER offer particular benefits for the learners of Asia - a continent which has ?the largest number of ultra-poor people in the world? (Dhanarajan & Porter, 2013, p. vii). One area in which OER have the potential to make a dramatic and extensive impact in Asia is within the field of teacher education, where the insufficient supply of teachers, a limited capacity for teacher training, disparities in pupil-teacher ratios, the large numbers of unqualified teachers, and inadequate continuing professional development (Commonwealth of Learning, 2013) are resulting in inadequate access to education and poor standards of learning for those already in the education system.

The challenges above are all present in India, where there is an estimated 1.33 million shortfall in teachers and many existing teachers are unqualified. Indeed, India?s Annual Status of Education (ASER) 2012 report identified ?an alarming degeneration? (ASER 2012, p. 1) in educational standards in Indian primary schools and a ?national crisis in learning? (p. 2). This paper presents research by the UK Open University?s OER Research Hub (www.oerresearchhub.org) (OERRH) on the impact of OER on teacher education and learning standards achieved by two India-based projects: TESS-India and Karnataka OER. TESS-India (Teacher Education in School Sector India) is informed by its sister project TESSA (Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa) (Wolfenden, 2008) and like that project TESS-India aims to use OER to reduce pressure on teacher education institutions, enabling them to deliver quality teacher training, at scale and speed. The TESS-India project will eventually work in partnership with education institutions across seven Indian states to create the biggest network of freely available, high quality, teacher education resources in India. Karnataka OER is more advanced in its development than TESS-India and comprises a wiki-based repository of OER intended to support the professional development and improved practice of practising teachers. The Karnataka OER wiki is built by a community of educators who are engaged in the continuous creation, review, curation and publishing of digital curricular resources.
A mixed methods strategy is being employed to explore the impact of OER on teacher education within these two projects. To date, an initial scoping study focused on teacher education practices in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar has gathered evidence of existing resource use through interviews with teacher-educators and with Principals of the District Institutes for Education and Training (DIETs), and evidence of existing teacher-education practice via lesson observations. It is planned that the research will be extended over the coming months to include surveys, interviews and lesson observations with OER-using teachers and teacher educators across India. At Open Ed we will report the findings from the Karnataka OER and TESS-India studies and discuss the implications for Commonwealth countries across the globe

Speakers
avatar for Robert Farrow

Robert Farrow

Research Associate, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror Project URLS: http://oerhub.net/ https://oerworldmap.org/ http://go-gn.net/ http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Qualification Director, Masters in Online & Distance Education, The Open University
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about openness and about women's empowerment.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:00pm - 3:25pm
White Pine